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https://www.duolingo.com/Microeconomist

Is Swedish truly the easiest language for someone who knows both English and German?

Hello,

I am a native English speaker and I am on my way to becoming fluent in German (currently living in Germany).

So would Swedish be the easiest next language for me or would that be Dutch or French?

Thanks for your input

2 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ginkkou
Ginkkou
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Swedish hands down. Very similar words and structures, very limited conjugations and genders...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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You could be describing Norwegian there, too. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ginkkou
Ginkkou
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I haven't tried Norwegian yet, but I intend to do after I'm done with Swedish; they seem to be kinda similar, so learning it should be even easier after that. (Though it seems it would have been easier the other way around, according to your post below)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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AFAIK Norwegian is even easier than Swedish (for example they have only 1 formation for plurals)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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I'm finding Norwegian easier. One more gender than Swedish, but a lot less plural forms.

Also, as a Norwegian speaker you'll have the advantage of understanding a lot more Swedish then a Swedish speaker can understand Norwegian. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olja.
Olja.
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Me too. + for me the Norwegian tree here on Duo is the most interesting one

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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There is that as well. It's not that the Swedish tree is in any way bad, but the Norwegian tree is my favorite of all the trees. It's superbly made.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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I agree - I find Norwegian easier than Swedish as well. I think Norwegian is probably the easiest language an English speaker can learn period, but being a German speaker will certainly speed a few things up.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zeitschleifer
Zeitschleifer
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Dutch, especially written Dutch, will be the easiest for you then. Only Dutch pronunciation can be difficult but Swedish seems to have its own tricky pronunciation issues too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviPolasak

I think Dutch might be a lot easier, since it's mostly German and English, not like Swedish. For example: ik=Ich=I, in Swedish it's Jag

Ik heb honger, Ich habe Hunger. I am hungry, Jag är Hungrig. Swedish differs more than Dutch does

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olja.
Olja.
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Not sure about Swedish but Dutch definitely is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Microeconomist

How the hell do you practice so many languages? how many of them are you actually fluent in?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olja.
Olja.
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Slowly but surely :) I'd say only Russian and English. I am not a polyglot, far from that :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviPolasak

Damn, you probably know more Hebrew than me, and it's both my parents native language, they spoke it all the time. I'm ashamed. Dang, that Dutch and Polish though o-o

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olja.
Olja.
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I spent some time in Israel and I've been learning Hebrew for over 7 years :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oskalingo
oskalingo
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Wow, someone claiming not to be a polyglot on duolingo. This must be a first :)

Congrats on both your modesty and your learning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olja.
Olja.
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Thank you! about "I am not a polyglot" - well, that's just a fact, without false modesty :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicolasa1989

Don't know about Dutch but definitely not French. French is in another language family - so if you already knew Spanish or Italian, then French would be easier.

I'm pretty much fluent in German (also lived there for a bit) and am now learning German - makes it a lot easier wtih Swedish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agrariana

Dutch, Swedish, Afrikaans, West Frisian, Scots, Danish, and Norwegian are all options, though sadly not all are on Duolingo. Norwegian is probably your best best!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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As a Swedish native speaker who learned German and English first, and then quickly and pretty effortlessly Dutch, I'd say probably Dutch.

Edit: This is because the Dutch grammar mirrors the German grammar, except almost everything is easier! I remember looking at the pages of irregular verbs thinking "these are exactly the same as in German, and they're irregular in the same way", whereas my German course mates where baffled, because they had of course never studied German that way. The one possible added adjective ending will make you want to cry tears of joy. Only the Dutch rules for making diminutives as well as the ones for the spelling of plurals will feel a little bit weird after learning German.

I've seen Germans become fluent in Dutch in about two years, without even having lived somewhere where they were surrounded by the language. Then again, I've seen pretty much the same happen with Germans learning Swedish... And whatever goes for Swedish, goes for Norwegian. Danish is a bit more tricky, because of the hot potatoes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
xaghtaersis
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Hmmm either Dutch or Swedish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelicGirl2

Most definitely Dutch. All the people that answered Swedish probably do not know Dutch. Because swedish differs a lot more from german.

I know English Swedish Dutch and German. And german is extremely closely related to dutch. (both in their roots, as in their current state. they haven't strayed far from ). If you know dutch you don't have to learn german to understand it, it is basicly the same with a slight different pronounciation (esepecially when you compare dutch dialects with german), basicly the sound of all the vowel in a word are different. (speaking or writing you do need to learn a bit for, cause getting the das der den etc right isn't a thing that comes natural. And the right spelling.)

As for swedish, it being a germanic language aswell, obviously a lot of things look familiar, but as mentioned before, the difference is greater than with dutch. (And for me german resembles swedish more than dutch resembles swedish,

For those interested, english, german and dutch are categorised as west-germanic languages, while norse, danish, swedish and icelandic are north-germanic.

French is a romanic language so even further away from the germanic languages. Though french has a lot of words that are recognisable in english or dutch. (these words entered our language either through french or directly from latin) most words starting witn con- com- or de- for instance.

5 months ago