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  5. "אני מחפש את הכלב שלי."

"אני מחפש את הכלב שלי."

Translation:I am looking for my dog.

September 16, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mosalf

It gives look as an option, The real meaning is to "look for"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/etieffen

As in "searching for something"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnShim1

Why does the sentence not say לכלב, if the correct translation is "for my dog"? I don't get this. Can someone explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Languages take verbs differently.

In Hebrew "searching for" is "לחפש את". It doesn't translate literally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhantomZapad

It's amazing how the same radical ח-פ-ש can mean "to look for" as in מחפש and "to mask" as in תחפושת


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

They are sort of opposite. Same letters can change meaning a lot when in different structures. Manu times there are interesting connections.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChayaDoppelt

Does it have anything to do with חיפושית? Just curious


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrspizza

kinda let to the party, but no. it has nothing to do with חיפושית.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Note the different ש consonant: /s/ sound in לחפש and להתחפש, vs. /sh/ sound in חיפושית. I believe a transition between the two is not common. Apparently in other semitic languages there is similar "root" for חיפושית, but with a nun: chunfush or suchlike.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, the etymology is not clear. Jastrow lists חִיפּוּשִׂיתָא beetle with a Sin, deriving it from the root חפשׂ to search together, which may then have been borrowed into Arabic with n-insertion as خُنْفُسَاء ḵunfusāʾ. But Sokoloff writes it חפושׁיתא as can be expected from the Middle Hebrew word, connecting it with Syriac ܚܲܒܫܘ̣ܫܬܵܐ [ḥabšušto] scarabee. And Hoch gives a syllabic Egyptian ʾ=p=ši₂=ya=t beetle, grasshopper. And it is unclear whether there were two proto-semitic roots (ḥVbVš- and ḥVinpVš) or just one. I find those critters quite difficult in their semitic development.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, the two words are considered to be derived from the same root, with הִתְחַפֵּשׂ having developed along the line of make oneself being looked for, i.e. make oneself unrecognizable, to disguise oneself, so that one must search for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/etieffen

Wow, this is amazing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Ani mechapes et ha'kelev sheli

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