"A man walks over to the fence, jumps over the fence, goes through the garden and climbs up to the roof? This is not good!"

Translation:Egy ember odamegy a kerítéshez, átugrik a kerítésen, átmegy a kerten és felmászik a tetőre? Ez nem jó!

2 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ray.meredith
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All but the last five words of the Hungarian target sentence were already provided, and I think the last five are pretty easy to unscramble. What do others think about such items? I've run into just a few, but each time I've wondered if they were usefully challenging.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanTatouse
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What kind of exercise were you doing? Did you have to translate the sentence or did you choose from 3 options? If you mean the latter, I don't think that type of exercise is very challenging in general.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ray.meredith
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The words that hadn't already been translated (Eng --> Magyar) were scrambled words, so there were five options (five words: a / ez / jó / nem / tetőre). I think, though, that your question about three options presupposes the multiple choice questions, in which entire sentences are presented as choices; mine wasn't MC.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanTatouse
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Oh, I never get that type of exercise, perhaps it's only in the mobile app version.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ray.meredith
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Yes, I only run into those sorts of items on the mobile app.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi
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What is that???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kowalsky2
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I don't see the point of these needlessly drawn out sentences either. I've never encountered anything like these in the other courses I've tried so far. Especially that "This is not good!" at the end. It's a most basic sentence without any relevance to this lesson. I'm astonished that anyone could think that it adds something to the exercise.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBaer1
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I thought ¨egy ember¨ translated to a person, and not to a man (férfi). Am I missing something?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kowalsky2
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There's some ambiguity. It stems from the male centeredness of our ancestors. "Man" can also be used to refer to people of unknown gender or humanity as a whole, although it's no longer preferred in our post-feminist world. AFAIK, originally ember also meant primarily man (and still does in some dialects), even though later its primary meaning became "human". But in colloquial speech, at least in singular, "ember" still heavily implies a male.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3
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When must we use ODA and when EL? It is not clear at all

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kowalsky2
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Oda is primarily "[to] there", el is primarily "away", even though both can be translated with "to". When used with verbs of movement, oda- (as a prefix) implies a shorter distance, I believe.

5 months ago
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