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  5. "Εγώ λέω ότι ξέρω."

"Εγώ λέω ότι ξέρω."

Translation:I say that I know.

September 17, 2016

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
Mod
  • 1488

Strictly speaking, should this be ό,τι instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995
Mod
  • 235

Yes. Εγώ λέω ότι ξέρω is "i say that i know"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

Yes, I tried to edit it but it's in the original sentence so I could only report it. Thanks to both of you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
Mod
  • 1488

Thought so, but I am a beginner! Thanks Troll.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nphx2

The disambiguating interpunct strikes again!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olympia.de

isn't "i say i know" correct, too? (to my opinion, THAT is not neccessary here, but i am no native speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

Yes, the ‘that’ is optional in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraGerd1

the meaning of ότι could be whatever or that in this case you could translate it I say whatever I know or I say that I know. And the meaning are really different, from where to know what it means exactly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The spelling should be different:

  • I say that I know = Λέω ότι ξέρω
  • I say whatever I know = Λέω ό,τι ξέρω

The comma is part of the spelling of the word. (And it's the only Greek word to have this special comma as part of it.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KostaPapas

Good explanation thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithAndre18

Many thanks to everyone for the interesting discussions above. My question, how did we end up with a comma in the middle of ό,τι? What is its origin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithAndre18

Excellent. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamil_Paul

In my Oxford Greek-English dictionary ότι means that and it's ό,τι that means what(ever).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kalikur

I have the pocket oxford greek dictionary and it has ότι as either 'that' or 'what'. Are there any native greek speakers that can give a translation of the actual meaning here, as there is a distinct difference between 'I say that I know' and 'I say what I know'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

Ό,τι = Whatever, anything, what

Θα κάνω ό,τι θέλω - I'll do what/whatever I like.

Θα κάνω ό,τι μπορώ για να σας βοηθήσω. - I'll do anything I can to help you.

Ότι = that

Μου είπε ότι θα πήγαινε στο πάρτι - He told me (that) he could go to the party.

Ξέρω ότι του είπες την αλήθεια. - I know (that) you told him the truth.

I hope this is a bit helpful too. ^.^

(And I agree. I wouldn't take Oxford's word as gospel. :P)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

The courses on Duolinog are created and moderated by native speakers of both the source and the target language with the proper credentials.

Oxford is a fine dictionary however, we can't expect the pocket version to be quite complete. There might be some confusion between ότι which is a conjunction and means "that"; and ό,τι a pronoun which means "whatever".

You might like this online compilation of dictionaries we find reliable: https://www.lexilogos.com/english/greek_dictionary.htm#

Don't forget to check out the links in the Greek Forum for other sites.

https://forum.duolingo.com/topic/936eek.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

The stress goes more to ο when it is ό,τι. Slight different but different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernst557459

This made me think of one of my favorite quotes by Laozi (Λάο Τσε): He who knows does not speak; he who speaks does not know. Can anyone quote this in Greek?

The wikiquote page for Laozi is available in 36 languages, but alas, not in Greek. https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Laozi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995
Mod
  • 235

"Αυτός που μιλάει δεν ξέρει. Αυτός που ξέρει δεν μιλάει."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirjam773655

how do you spell chi on the anglogreek key board


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

chi is on the letter "x": χ

xi is on the letter "j": ξ

At least on the Windows Greek keyboard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

This link has a section on whee to find the Greek letters on the keyboard. You might find it helpful. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/22424028


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel147471

Is there a word for "tell/telling", like "I'm telling you, I don't know"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Also λέω, as in Σου λέω ότι δεν ξέρω.

"tell" roughly means "say to" -- so if you include the recipient (σου λέω, "I say to you"), then the most natural translation will often be "tell" ("I tell you / I'm telling you").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gran31

I wouldn't say 'that' I would say 'what(=that which)' I know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

Using "what" or "that which" changes the meaning. The sentence here means..."I inform you that I am aware of something." E.g. Someone says. "Today is Sunday." and I say "I know." it means I am aware that today is Sunday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

In addition to jaye's comment, "I say what I know" would be "Λέω ό,τι ξέρω". Ο,τι with a comma means what/whatever, whereas ότι means that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plakakaneis

The normal speed sound is not clear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RolandVirn

Why is 'I say, that I do know' incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

Why do you think it's correct? How could that be used? I'm serious if you know then we can include it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vemund75118

In mathematics we were told that zero means 0. Is zero(ζερο) α different word from ξερο?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

In Greek "zero" is " μηδέν".

"ξέρω" notice the first letter is "ξ" not "ζ" and it means "I know"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"I know" is ξέρω, not ξέρο.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 323

Whoops, caught me sleeping. Thanks, I corrected my error above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

0 in Greek is μηδέν.

(The English word "zero" comes from Italian and ultimately goes back to Arabic via Latin. No Greek involved.)

ζ and ξ are separate letters in Greek, if that is what you are asking. The first sounds like /z/ as in "buzz", the second like /ks/ as in "bucks".

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