"Ellas van a saber leer."

Translation:They will know how to read.

February 6, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arturohiero

Saber + infinitive = to know how to.

August 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike_Nash

Except they had a previous sentence about 'van a saber nadar' and their translation for that was 'they are going to learn how to swim'. The inconsistency is what irritates me.

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monzsenior

It's Free, they are only trying to help you, get over it.

December 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynnandlarry

I agree

May 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plauben

something new to learn - I did look up saber and "to know how to" is one of its meanings

February 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidmalt

There are two answers mentioned as correct. The one above and : "They will know how to read. These two do not have the same meaning in English....

September 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisagnipura

Hola davidmalt: I agree, but Duo does not. I have reported this type of error many times, but Duo has not changed.

November 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian_Brewer

It's a very odd sentence. I have to wonder if it's something anyone would ever actually say in Spanish, or if it's just formulated to teach translation. Duolingo seems to have a lot of sentences that are peculiar in English -- I'm not sure what context anyone would say something like this. I could understand, "Ellas van a aprender leer," but this sentence seems to imply either that they don't currently know how to read and are going to learn it in the future (then why not use aprender?), or you're telling someone a group of people one is expecting in the future is already able to read. I could only see that if someone needs to be reassured that the 'they' in question will be able to read something. In either case, it's still peculiar.

May 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenHigh

Ian....here is a possible context. I am a teacher of English as a second language. When discussing my students I could be talking in general about them in the future after I have been teaching them for awhile. "They are going to know how to read."

In reality I would probably say something like "They are going to be able to read English at the 8th grade level."

November 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariedarragh

Just reported this. In my opinion: In English, you would say I know / don't know how to read, but you wouldn't say you are going to know how to, as it is not an action. You would say you are going to learn.

May 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goren17

I think "they are going to be able to read" should be also accepted

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snootfull

I tried to cheat by touching the speak button after I touched the microphone thingy but I got it wrong because duolingo would not accept its own voice

June 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snootfull

Duolingo will not listen to its own voice

June 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerJames5

Why is "Slow Voice" growling at me? I promise to be kind if he wants to learn Norwegian. The Italian voice is a delight..

December 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EDK-Learner

Sound quality is poor. Saber sounds like Server.

October 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vito731420

oh, come on! ellos vs ellas not a real big mistake.

April 20, 2018
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