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  5. "הוא מעצב מכנסיים חדשים לשחקן…

"הוא מעצב מכנסיים חדשים לשחקן."

Translation:He designs new pants for the actor.

September 18, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2finalbriancells

Are they the king's "invisible" pants that only wise people can see? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrunnoHC

Is to the player wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

I don't think English works that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrunnoHC

Ok, thank you. It just was the suggested translation (for לשחקן)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

The preposition ל- can be translated to either "for" or "to", depending on context.

The suggestions are out of context. A known Duo limitation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrunnoHC

Yes! And there is a word that can be translated to for and to in my native language, too. (The word is para, and the language is Portuguese)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Like French pour?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrunnoHC

Yes. In Portuguese there are two prepositions for "for" and "to", that are "para" and "a", but they haven't exact translations in English and in Hebrew (the same with french "pour" and "a") (sometimes they represent "for" and "to", but in practice it's pretty rare to occour)...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew_McCarty

In old Shakespearean English it does...but that was 500 years ago...


[deactivated user]

    It seems to me that player should e correct too... Why is it not?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

    No one's perfect. Report it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenSmart2

    It's now accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alinarj7

    How do we know it's not "pants for the new actor?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry824711

    That would be "מכנסיים לשחקן החדש".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waterclaude

    החדש always follows the noun ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

    Yes, adjectives follow the nouns in Hebrew. (A friend of mine once found an exception, in a common slang adjective borrowed from Arabic - it brought with it the Arabic word order... This rarity just goes to show how strong the rule is.)

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