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Indirect relative form of the copula

Sin fear ar fuath leis a chlann. Can someone explain why the indirect relative form of the copula is used here, and maybe provide a few more examples with explanations? Thanks.

2 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's because of the preposition. If you were to directly translate it from English, it would require the direct relative clause. However, since Irish uses a prepositional phrase to express ownership, it becomes indirect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

But wouldn't ''the food that I like'' be an bia is maith liom? And it has a preposition too.

What about sin gasúr ar peileadóir maith é? Why is it used in this example?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

But wouldn't ''the food that I like'' be an bia is maith liom? And it has a preposition too.

Because here the subject of the first clause is 'food', which would be the object in Is maith liom bia. With the one give above, you have Sin é an fear. Is leis an carr. Because fear = leis here, you use indirect. It's not because the preposition itself but because of what the preposition is referencing.

What about sin gasúr ar peileadóir maith é? Why is it used in this example?

I would need to see it, but it's definitely a Connacht thing. What book are you getting these examples out of? It might help us help you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks. It's all very complicated. It's from Nollaig Mac Congail's Irish grammar book.

2 years ago

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CadetheBruce
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It's not clear to me either, but I suspect it has to do with fuath leis counting as a preposition idiom here and thus requiring ar. Stenson's Intermediate Irish only gives one example, on pg. 27 in Unit 4 (the following are direct quotes for the book):

Ar is also the indirect relative form of the copula, used with copula + preposition idioms when they form the basis of a relative clause:

an duine ar leis an carr - the person who owns the car

But that's all I can find on this at the moment. Copula sentences with a preposition idiom that forms the basis of a relative clause will use the indirect relative particle ar instead of a. Seems easy enough to remember....lol.

Given how little attention Stenson gives to this, I suspect she regards it as a minor exception to the overall rules of forming a relative clause, and to a native or advanced speaker it probably seems like that. Unfortunately for most learners, little words with so many uses like ar can be vastly confusing and unclear. :\

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks.

2 years ago