https://www.duolingo.com/Toblerone

Ĉu estas multaj esperantistoj ne parolas la anglan?

From what I've seen, on facebook and elsewhere online, most people who speak Esperanto also know English fairly well. It would be a shame if most esperantistoj were actually anglalingvano...

So I can't help but ask, do you know many esperantistoj who don't speak English? Are there forums or chat groups where I can talk with esperantistoj from non-English backgrounds?

September 21, 2016

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto

For a number of reasons, it's absolutely true that many many Esperantists speak English. It would be wrong, however, to assume that all of them do. I didn't have to look very far before I started meeting people who:

1 - Speak English, but speak Esperanto better than English. 2 - Don't really speak English.

The first category is really a continuum. Even people who speak English very well will appreciate being able to communicate on a level playing field through Esperanto. Even fluent non-natives have to "speak uphill" when talking to a native.

Of course, it helps to meet these people if you're not inside an English-speaking country when you are looking - and I think this includes looking on-line. Certainly various on-line spaces are subject to intentional and unintentional filter biases. The forum for an English-based Esperanto course is not a great place to meet people who don't speak English, for example.

That said - I've seen some familiar faces on the forum here, and some of them absolutely are people who speak Esperanto much better than English. I'm not sure that this fact comes so readily through the screen.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rev_ero

You have to think that there are many Esperanto speakers older than fifty and English got the role of international language after WWII and that wasn't a thing of two days. Also you have to think that until the eighties of the last century part of Europe, was a totally different political block and even if they learnt English probably not everybody did and not everybody learnt it in good level. Also, not everybody learn English today in a good level for many reasons. So, maybe there is not a very big number of Esperanto speakers who can't speak at all English but there are many of them who don't speak it well. Anyway if I can choose, as native Spanish speaker, I rather speak Esperanto than English. It's more comfortable to me.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

In the early 1900's, Esperanto was a common language among anarchists and libertarian communists globally (as the common language of the international proletariat), with the spread of European anarchist literature to areas such as China being a direct result of Esperanto communications between Chinese and Europeans. Source article , see also Sifo, famous Chinese anarchist and Esperantist.

I started corresponding with Japanese Esperantists recently, as Japan also has a history of Esperanto. Brasil is also a popular place for Esperanto, as well as the Russian Federation and Spain (most Esperanto language anarcho-punk bands I listen to are also coming from the aforementioned countries). These countries also don't have a strong tradition of English language instruction.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HarrisonRhys

There was also Ba Jin AKA Bakin, a major Chinese author and Anarchist who lived to be over a hundred. https://libcom.org/history/jin-ba-1904-2005

Where can I find these Esperanto punk songs? I'm interested in listening to more Esperanto language music but haven't had much luck in that genre.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

I posted some Esperanto punk band links in this Duolingo thread

Elŝuti ligilo por Esperanto Subgrunde kompilo senpaga.

Dankon pro la Bakin ligilo.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

Ankaŭ en Japanio , historio de Esperanto kaj anarkiismo: "The Japanese anarchists and anarcho-syndicalists, however, did not evolve in a closed environment. They were always informed, sometimes after a certain delay, of the theoretical trends and strategic debates of the movement in the rest of the world. They were always making contacts, traveling and translating. Kotoku Shusui (1871-1911) went to the United States; Osugi Sakae (1885-1923) to France and China; Ishikawa Sanshiro (1876-1956) to Belgium and France (where he was the guest of Paul Reclus) and to China in 1927; Iwasa Sakutaro (1879-1967) to California and China; Yamaga Taiji (1892-1970) to China, Taiwan and the Philippines. Besides learning to speak western languages, many of them also spoke Esperanto (Osugi Sakae, Yamaga Taiji, etc.)." al Libcom artikolo/afiŝo

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HarrisonRhys

I'm actually fairly certain the nation with the largest Esperanto community is actually China. Actual numbers are a bit hard to find but the community is big enough to make an Esperanto language news service feasible http://esperanto.cri.cn/ complete with video and radio broadcasts. I've also seen advertisements for really specific Esperanto conventions like meetings for Esperantistoj business leaders, which I'm pretty sure is unique to the history of Esperanto.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/1997zqy

Esperanto learning in China was populated in 1980s, but without long time practise, these learners almost forget lots of words and phrases in Esperanto. What's more, those who born after 1990, almost never heard of Esperanto - 世界语(It means the worldwide language), if you talk to them about Esperanto, you would find that they think English is the worldwide language. I'm now live in the city of Chengdu, with the population of 12 million people. But I think just around 120 people can speak Esperanto in Chengdu, most of them are over 50 years old(age of 20+ in 1980s)

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor

I love that you said that because I actually discovered Esperanto while living in China, and I told a friend about it and called it 世界语 and her immediate response was 我以为英语是世界语 (I thought English was the international language).

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

世界语 first Google hit was to Esperanto wikipedia article.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto

I seem to remember the late Don Harlow saying something similar a number of years ago. Along the same lines, China also probably has the largest number of tennis players - simply because they have the most people. I met an Esperanto speaker in Shanghai. I didn't ask him if he also spoke English - although I bet that just like Esperanto speakers and tennis players, it also has the most English learners.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/johnson/2011/09/english-china

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Evildea

When I was in Beijing, I had the pleasure of visiting Chinese International Radio and chatting with about eight working Esperanto speakers. It was really fascinating seeing them hard at work. They were also all very fluent and from the few I talked to; apparently, they had studied Esperanto at uni. They also have a massive conference room with a giant picture of Zamenhof which was kind of scary. Though, giant paintings of important people are the norm in China.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto

Aw man! Opportunity missed. I was in Beijing too but didn't meet any Esperanto speakers there.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KimJoonHyuk

Interesting, because one of the reasons that I decided to start learning Esperanto three months ago, was a memory from when I was visiting Beijing in 2004. When I went to see the Great Wall at Badaling, there were banners waving in the breeze and loudspeakers blaring music, but I knew it wasn't Chinese. I asked, and was told that it was Esperanto music, and the reason it was playing was because the International Esperanto Congress was in Beijing that year.

October 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto

To be fair, I was there to help my aging dad enjoy his tour with a chorus group he was in. I did meet an Esperanto speaker in Shanghai. I would have loved to have been able to visit the international radio station, though.

October 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

La kosmostacio "Tiangong-1"/ "Ĉiela palaco-1" nun falas de orbito, kaj CRI (Ĉina Radio Internacia-Esperanto) ne havas novaĵoj pri ĝi. La nur Esperanto parolante Ĉinaj homoj, ili ne scias la ĉielo falas. Kaŝu sub kovraĵo !

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ThatOneDoge

Oh my gosh, hearing Chinese Esperanto accents is FANTASTIC xD Thank you :D

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HarrisonRhys

Yeah its a pretty interesting site, just remember its run by the Chinese government, so as a news site its not very good on certain topics. Though it's pretty good on culture and tourism and history (both China and the Esperanto community). And it has very comprehensive if basic news on other nations. http://esperanto.cri.cn/2521/2016/09/22/179s188969.htm They also do or did news broadcasts, some are on youtube.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

There was one article I read on CRI that mentioned the Chinese foreign ministers' visit to Canada, seemed "positive" from a PRC perspective, bilateral cooperation etc (Jes jes, ŝtato kapitalismo kaj nova liberalismo, la plej bonaj amikojn). Yet the CBC version of the story told how said foreign minister rudely berated a Canadian journalist when asked about human rights abuse in China, something that was not mentioned (accidentally omitted?) in the CRI Esperanto version of events....

I'm guessing news like Ĉinio : la ĉina ribela vilaĝo Wukan denove sieĝata will never appear in CRI-Esperanto.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph

http://lernu.net/en

la retpaĝo havas forumojn en multaj lingvoj, ne nur la angla lingvo.

Vi povas ankaŭ vidi membroj laŭ / per nacieco

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Toblerone

Dankon! I searched users by language, and there are people from 30 different languages, including 1500 French speakers, 2000 Russian speakers, 3500 Portuguese speakers, and 4000 Spanish speakers (approx). I guess Lernu must be the best place to meet non-anglophones!

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Mandiras

Mi ĵus hodiaŭ trovis postoj ĉe Lernu de rusoj ke serĉas esperantajn resursojn por lerni la anglan. Interesis min, ke ili parolas esperanton pli bone ol la anglan, aŭ nur esperanton.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jirka92122

Note that internet is to some degree English-centric itself. It is becoming less so each day, but internet use is more prevalent in countries where English is a common language. So looking online is bound to produce more English speakers (of various degrees of proficiency).

Companies like Google will make you think that everyone speaks whatever language 1) is used in the country you are in 2) is the language you search in. If searching for resources in english in the US, you are going to get essentially 100% english language sites even when looking for esperanto resources. On the other hand if I am in czech and I search online there, even if I'm searching in english, I keep getting lots of Czech language websites.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianofPeace

Mi volas paroli kun homoj kiuj ne parolas la anglan.

September 25, 2016
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