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"Usted reconoce sus errores."

Translation:You acknowledge your mistakes.

1
5 years ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Reinhild

What is wrong with: you admit your mistakes?

21
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nic93snk
nic93snk
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Eso significa usted admite sus errores

12
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattDrogowski

It was correct in my case.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

That should be correct.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winandfx

it is accepted. (at first I wrote you admit you mistakes. It was a mistake. I admit.)

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky_clarkson

Could it be valid as "You recognise its errors"?

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crasshelmet
crasshelmet
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I agree. Could someone please explain why "you recognize its errors" isn't accepted? I know the sentence sounds a little weird, but is it not grammatically correct?

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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I think because 'you' is already the subject, any ambiguous pronoun would also default to 'you' if there is no other clue.

12
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jal2hdez
jal2hdez
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You are right. It is beyond ambiguos, it can be of anyones but of: "my (mis)", "tus (yours informal singular)", or "ours (nuestros)"

For any othre pronoun it is "su/sus" and most times used along: de él, de ella, de usted...

9
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rbrave
rbrave
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"you recognize your errors" was accepted today

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyG
MikeyG
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"You recognise their errors" is acceptable.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drj0000

I put "you recognize their mistakes" which was correct

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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Guessing here, but is "su" only used for people (and not things)? So "its errors" would rather probably be something like "los errores (de whatever)"?

-3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jal2hdez
jal2hdez
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No, it is used for any possesion singular object. Mia has her dog- Mia tiene su perro. Jay went to his car-Jay fue a su carro The room has its bathroo- el cuarto tiene su baño They see their mom-ellos/ellas ven a su mamá

"Sus" is because there are errorS

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelina58824

"RECOGNIZE YOUR ERRORS" LITERALLY SHOULD BE THE ONLY ACCEPTED ANSWER, BECAUSE THAT IS LITERALLY WHAT RECONOCER MEANS.

IT DOESN'T MEAN TO ADMIT, TO REALIZE, KNOW, TO DISCOVER, OR ANY OF THAT CONVOLUTED OR LITERALLY INCORRECT STUFF.

IT. MEANS. RECOGNIZE. LITERALLY NOTHING ELSE!

DON'T YOU PEOPLE UNDERSTAND? YOU'RE LITERALLY LEARNING A LANGUAGE! THAT MEANS LITERALLY LEARNING EXACTLY WHAT EACH AND EVERY SINGLE INDIVIDUAL WORD MEANS! IT'S NOT ABOUT LEARNING "THE BASIC MEANING" OF THE SENTENCE!

IT'S ABOUT LITERALLY, LEARNING THE LITERAL EXACT MEANING OF EVERY SINGLE INDIVIDUAL WORD. OTHERWISE YOUR ARE LEARNING IT INCORRECTLY!

-4
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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You are literally wrong. Look the word up in a spanish dictionary. Reconocer can mean "recognize", "admit", "Acknowledge", "examine", "survey" or "identify" depending on context and usage. Learning a language is very rarely a case of simply memorising a single meaning for a word and translating passages word-for-word. If it were, google translate would give perfect translations every time.

By the way, PUTTING SOMETHING IN CAPS DOESN'T MAKE IT TRUE.

5
Reply12 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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recognize is with a z. Well at least in US English it is ;-)

-11
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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US English isn't much of a guide to how to spell properly though. You keep missing the "u"s out of words, and get your "r" and "e" the wrong way around at the end of other words. And don't get me started on how you guys spell "plough", "doughnut" and "tonight". Also there's an "i" in aluminium. And for some reason you spell "aubergine" as "zucchini". That's only got one letter in the correct place! I suppose in comparison, spelling "recognise" wrong is pretty minor.

(tongue firmly in cheek) ;-)

17
Reply44 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oenothera
Oenothera
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Whilst I agree with most of what you say, I think you'll find that in the US they spell aubergine 'eggplant'. It's courgette that they spell as 'zucchini'. Forgive my pedantry, but I'm a horticulturist first and foremost, and a very amateur linguist.

5
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Ouch. You're absolutely right, foolish mistake for me to make.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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At least the Americans got one letter of "aubergine" correct. Baldrick couldn't get a single letter of "Christmas" right and he was English :) In a way that brings me to my point: "English" English is often not so "English" as we think. It is a language that borrows, embraces, adapts and adopts, while always somehow remaining stoicly English. Often, however, it is these changes that take English English away from American English and not vice versa. "Fall" for example, was common until the 18th century when "autumn" became fashionable, then the new norm. Apparently many of the "ize"/"ise" differences may have resulted from a similar process: http://www.metadyne.co.uk/ize.html

4
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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You make a good point. I've heard it said that US English is much closer to "olde" English than modern British English.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yeah. Rather like their politics!

1
13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lightningb602630
Lightningb602630
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You have a point. Despite English being a germanic language, half of the language is French (or borrowed from French) after England was invaded, and now only a quarter of English is actually german. Then as if that isn't enough, they start stealing words from other places from languages you might not expect like Hindi, Chinese, Swahili and Australian Languages. (There are some words from more obvious languages like Spanish and Italian. Bond that together and what do you get? Some messed up language now known as English. Also we sometimes say hello in other languages just for fun, like 你好 (nihao) from chinese, hola from spanish, bonjour from French, it's crazy. And then they aren't bothered to make a 'new' word so they use old ones with a new meaning, like snake and K.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Sure, jellonz, but my English dictionary often gives both s and z as valid alternatives. It's not like your z or nothing! :-)

And we're not all Baldricks in UK, just as I know you are not all Dubyas! :-)

Ah, but who cares? We shouldn't lose sight of which country has the largest population of English speakers in the World .............
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India! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hoorah! :-) ;-)
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C17: probably from German hurra; compare huzzah

-2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Not my "Z"s Roger. I'm a Kiwi, so I'm a fellow "ise" user :)

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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My apologies, jellonz. I'm not great at picking up the accent from emails! :-)

It's never fair to generalise, but I find it is much more fun to wind up the Mercans than the Kiwis. Perhaps too many of our US cousins don't know when to have a sense of humour unless someone is holding up a board saying "LAUGH NOW". With NZers, you tend to get back at least as much as you give.

Anyway, I shouldn't have said UK. As you said, Baldrick was English. That's when I'm inclined to fall back on the Scottish side of my family!

Maybe I shouldn't mock them. I often watch some of the silly behaviour in the US and fall back on that good old English word, schadenfreude. :-)

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack872103

How did you get pawpaw out of papaya?

0
Reply2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twindave

In British English, many US spellings using Z are spelled with an S (recognise, stabilise, civilisation, etc.)

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

...and in Canada we are not quite sure. "Ess?" "Zee?" "Zed?". Personally I use s and z more or less at random. Please don't copy my example. I am sure there are standard Canadian spellings. I just don't think more than a handful of people know them.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky_clarkson

As I understand it, Canadians spell words the same way their Queen does.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

In theory - and that's a good thing IMO. Many people in the course of business and personal correspondence, do as I do and mix match. Windows did not have Canadian English as an option last time I checked. Please correct me if I am wrong.

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Sí, Percy. And Apple offers English and British English! Grrrr!

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

I have had various learned people try to convince me it is all to do with the Ancient Greek origin of various verbs, and that the letter "zeta" should be rendered as "z", not "s".

This is part of what is known as "Oxford spelling", a standard followed by the Oxford University Press, inter alia. See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_spelling

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/badbadr
badbadr
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someone please tell me why " you know your errors " wasn't accepted

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aicaramba

Isn't sus meant to mean her, his, their? I would translate 'you recognize your errors' to 'usted reconoce tus errores'.

'You recognize his errors' is not considered correct.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky_clarkson

sus can mean any of her, his, their, your. It depends entirely on the context. Generally where I see Usted instead of tu (or vos, as I live in Argentina) 'su' is used instead of 'tu', and hence 'sus' instead of 'tus'. I don't know whether that's a general rule or just happenchance.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky_clarkson

Further, I think 'su' can be a bit more formal, like "one's" in overly formal English. One must take one's belongings -> Usted debe llevar sus pertenencias.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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I see "one" as impersonal indirect or general statement, besides possibly formal.
"one must take one's belongings" : "uno debe llevar sus pertenencias".

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EquanimousLingo
EquanimousLingo
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Una cualidad ausente en las gentes de hoy

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

What about..

"You know your faults"?

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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"you are acknowledging your mistakes" was marked wrong, why?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I think they probably want the simple present tense here, 'you recognise/acknowledge', rather than the continuous tense.

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebrun
siebrun
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Why isn't faults correct?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I think 'fault' would probably be 'defecto', whereas 'mistake' is 'error'.

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SevenYearIllini

Why no use of a direct object pronoun here? Thanks!

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jayken

What do you mean? It could be "usted los reconoce" but then how would we know what "los" is replacing? Direct object pronouns replace the direct object to avoid repetition. It's not needed here because if we used it then we wouldn't know what you are acknowledging. The sentence would say "You acknowledge them" instead of "You acknowledge your mistakes". :)

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay.Ey
Jay.Ey
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It accepts "you don't acknowledge your mistakes" and "you don't acknowledge their mistakes"--why not also "you don't acknowledge ITS mistakes"?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuintanillaJon

Because it's a third person possessive adjective, "it" isn't a person. Also, "su" is usually (possibly only) his/her.

-1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Quite a range of acceptance. I answered correctly "you recognize their mistakes." Compared to 'you acknowledge your mistakes'. Someone asked about use of pronouns & this sentence because it is so ambiguous would be no less confusing had you chosen to use them.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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You recognize your errors. was accepted.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunrises
sunrises
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If I want to say "I recognize its errors," how SHOULD it be said?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky_clarkson

"Reconozco sus errores." However, if it's not obvious from the context whether it's her, his, their, your, one, its, just specify the object, e.g., "Reconozco los errores del programa".

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpetrillo3

Why is it "sus" and not "tus"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jemenake

Because we are addressing the person in the formal tone. We could say "Tu' reconoces tus errores", but notice that the "s" is added to "reconoce".

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deadpixel_8

I have a question. How do we clarify who "sus" refers to in this example? Would it be grammatically correct to say "Usted reconoce sus errores de ella/él." to mean "You acknowledge her/his mistakes."?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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No that would not me correct. It's either "sus errores" or "los errores de él/ella". Generally you know from context who "su(s)" refers to, just like you know who "él" or "ella" refers to.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeersMPGA
JeersMPGA
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How would you distinguish between recognise and acknowledge? Context?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmathiasen

Am I the only one thinking that the audio is way of? L instead for R. Really sounds like Le conoce not Reconoce (I know it does not make sense her, but still).

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soleigarc

I feel that Duolingo should acually teach you some of the vocabulary words that Duolingo will use in the future. That would be very helpful if you did. Thanks!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olgaz007

What's wrong with "you own to your mistakes"?

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Although 'reconocer' can be 'to own up to', it is usually best with these sentences to use the most obvious translation that makes sense, which in this case, is 'recognise'.

0
Reply8 months ago