"Bạnlấyquyểnsáchkhông?"

Translation:Do you take the book?

2 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DanielGold14

Should it translate to "Did you get the book?" instead?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Songve

That would be past tense.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuyJohnny

I would translate it as "are you going to get the book?".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuyJohnny

Did you get the book could be better translates as: “ban co lay quyen sach chua?“ Which indicates past tense, by using "yet".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Waaneer
Waaneer
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You think so because "có" is translated as "have", which would litteraly mean "have you took" but you should also remember "có" as a yes-no question marker when it's not by itself. (not native at all but I think I've figured out this "có" issue)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisBotto1

This is a Venglish translation. I can't think of any situation where "Do you take the book?" would be considered proper use of English. It should be "Did you take the book?".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kebzter

There is a small use case as some sort of mental question. But i dont think its ever natural to say it like that in english

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dreamergirl03

i think this should be change to 'did you take the book' 'do' does not make sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jer246375

I wish the speaker would put effort into clear/precise pronunciation. I have my relatives (native speakers) listen to some of this and they have to hear it 8 times to get the wording right.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/walgen
walgen
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is this get like obtain or get like understand?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

To take, physically (obtain).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/plibauer

There is a possible use case, for example an acting scene and the director is posing a question to 2 actors; "Do you take the book?" ... "Or does he take the book?".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
Dan553966
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There is nothing ungrammatical in English with "Do you take the book?" The problem is that it is hard to imagine a situation in which a native speaker would actually say this in English. If the Vietnamese is something that might be expected to occur in speech, the translation is either flawed or one of multiple, context-driven possibilities. Literally, though, "Do you take the book?" is what we have been taught.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JCMcGee
JCMcGee
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And yet there is something "ungrammatical" about "ungrammatical"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
Dan553966
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Really?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChiquitaBl1
ChiquitaBl1
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How would you ask Do you have to take the book?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheTuti
SheTuti
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...by using 'phải' with 'lấy' I suppose?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertWitt7

An academic quarterly known amongst the speakers as "the book". Context like "do you take the pill". Obscure but plausible

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cat20138

The correct way to say this in english would be "Did you take the book" although in Vietnamese one would say "đã lấy"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JCMcGee
JCMcGee
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Keep it present tense - have you taken the book?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c3trash
c3trash
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I would interpret this as "Are you taking the book?" I imagine this would be posed in a scenario where you're offered someone a book and you're asking if they are going to take it or not.

1 month ago
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