"Visszaköltözöl Angliából?"

Translation:Do you move back from England?

September 23, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BetsyLowe

As a native English speaker, the only part that sounds odd is the "do". It would be normal to ask "Are you moving back from England?" I'm an Army wife, and i ask people about moving all the time.

December 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Your version is accepted, too.

December 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Raphi_K

but this grammatical form "Do you move back from England?" is incorrect in English.

BetsyLowe is quite correct - it should be "Are you moving back from England?"

"Do you move back from England" is awkward at best.

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

This sentence is difficult for me. Moving back FROM somewhere? Is it not much more natural to move back TO a previous place?

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DoktorVirag

Moving back FROM somewhere is fine in English. I think it sounds more natural to ask "Are you moving back from England" as opposed to "Do you move back from England".

September 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dqJacO

I'll go further than that and say that someone saying "Do you move back from England" would sound like a foreigner making a mistake. Our Duolingo friends need to look up the rules for using simple present vs. continuous present in English.

November 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Well, when you move back to somewhere, don't you at the same time move FROM somewhere? Maybe the "TO" part is understood. Is this really a strange sentence in English?

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

Yes, for me this possibility does't sound logic. I can imagine to move anywhere and also to move back to places, where i had been before. But to move BACK FROM instead of BACK TO, without the missing part of the sentences (where does the Person move to, if he is moving back) is quite difficult to understand.

September 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Well, I guess it has to be understood from the context. Moving back to where you grew up, home, to the home town, back to your native country, etc. Maybe you came back home for a visit, talking to old friends, and they ask you: "Will you ever come/move back from England?"

September 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Raphi_K

It's not that strange, in English we would give some indication of the destination though, but it is acceptable...

It's the "do" part that is really strange.

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/dqJacO

On its own, it's a little strange. But if you are in Hungary and you are talking to someone who used to live in England, it would be perfectly natural to ask them "When did you move back from England."

November 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Raphi_K

I guess the to part must be given in the earlier context...

"Are you moving back [here] from England?" or "Are you moving back to [place] from England?" is more natural...

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

Her v-sound sounds like a p.

March 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Tielbert

Is there an extra stress on the Á before ból?

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

It's not exactly an additional stress, but a change of pitch. Just like you raise the pitch towards the end of a question in English, in Hungarian yes-no questions there is typically a higher pitch on the second-to-last syllable.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Tielbert

It means that the pitch is because of the interrogative sentence, not because of the -ból?

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Yes, exactly. The suffix has nothing to do with that. It's only there because the sentence is a yes-no question.

The statement "Visszaköltözöl Angliából" would be pronounced without that pitch raise.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Tielbert

Köszönöm szépen!

August 17, 2018
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