"The kid drinks the apple juice."

Translation:Đứa trẻ uống nước ép táo.

2 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

I still don't understand how to tell if it's "the" or "a/an". I know if the sentence contains "mot" it will be "a/an", but if it doesn't how do I tell? Will it always be "the" if the sentence doesn't contain "mot"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

I've understood it now. For example, "nguoi" is something called a human classifier. This means that in any sentence where you talk about a man or woman, you need to include nguoi for it to make sense. So if the sentence says "Toi la nguoi phu nu" that would mean "I am the woman". However, if the sentence contains "mot", for example "Toi la mot nguoi phu nu." that means "I am a woman". I hope that helps everyone.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tangentmonkeys

The translation should be: "Đứa trẻ/bé uống nước táo ép"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

It can be either actually and each has a subtle difference:

táo ép focuses on the fact that it's apples that have been squeezed to make the juice

ép táo focuses on the fact that it's a drink made using apples

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tangentmonkeys

"Nước táo ép" means the juice was squeezed from the apple, "nước ép táo" means the water is beating the ❤❤❤❤ out of the apple! They are not interchangeable, people who don't understand grammar use the phrase "nước ép táo" just as people use double negative in English. They're both grammatically incorrect, they're just used too often people get used to them!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

I never said that they were interchangeable, you are just twisting words like usual. I said that they can refer to the same thing but arise out of subtle differences. Táo ép refers to the fact that the apple has been squeezed into a near all liquid form as opposed to something like nước táo xay (apple juice that is the result of grinding/being put into a blender and thus will likely have bits of fruit in it). When you go and buy apple juice you will say nước táo ép but when you're referencing the fact that the apple juice is the result of squeezing the liquids out of it, you can say nước ép táo. Yes, nước ép táo can also mean that the water or liquid is pressuring the apple but that's simply the ambiguity of the three words at work. The same thing happens in English like in "apple peeling machine" which can mean a machine that peels apples or that the apple is peeling the machine.

P.S: "people who doesn't understand grammar" --- that grammar lmao.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tangentmonkeys

Saying "nước ép táo" is the same as "nước táo ép" is the same as saying "you're a little ❤❤❤❤" is the same as "you ❤❤❤❤ a little". Oh I know, why don't you make a case that "bún thịt nướng" (roasted- meat-noodle) should mean the same as "bún nướng thịt" (noodle roasting meat?)?

So what if I made a grammar mistake from time to time? I have never said anything about not making any mistake. Unlike somebody else I don't keep on arguing trying to make my grammar mistake sounds like it's the right way to execute the sentence!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tabritandy

Is "nuoc tao ep" the template for juices from other fruits?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaplesStev

can you also just say nước táo without the ép?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StewartMM

Why no classifier here?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

Đứa already semi-functions as a classifier.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gray459499

I thought "tao" ment i or me?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kenneth710611

Tôi = I or me. Táo = apple

1 month ago
Learn Vietnamese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.