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  5. "Το ποτήρι του νερού."

"Το ποτήρι του νερού."

Translation:The water glass.

September 24, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

This same question has arisen in other similar exercises, but just to confirm "Το ποτήρι του νερού" can mean both "the water glass" (i.e. "glass that is used for serving water") AND "the glass of water" (i.e. "a serving of water contained in a glass")? This is like how "το πιάτο της σαλάτας" can mean both "the salad plate" and "the plate of salad," right? I guess I would like to know if there is another way to distinguish the two meanings...for example, you are in your bedroom and you call out to your σύζυγος (who is in the kitchen) to bring you "ένα ποτήρι του νερού"...would he/she likely bring you an (empty) water glass or a glass of water? I am assuming (perhaps incorrectly?) that the latter is the default interpretation... but how would you specify the former? (i.e. you just want a water glass with nothing in it)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artemis.lyl

I think "a glass of water" is "ενα ποτηρι νερο". Το ποτηρι του νερου is the glass of the water, not the glass of water. I'm not a native speaker, but I have read something like "ενα ποτηρι νερο" in a book from which I learnt Greek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teopap2

That's right, ένα ποτήρι νερό is a glass with water inside, ένα ποτήρι του νερού is a glass for water. If you ask for ένα ποτήρι του νερού, your σύζυγος will probably bring an empty glass.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

That is exactly what I was wondering. Tώρα καταλαβαίνω. Ευχαριστώ!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

ευχαριστώ πολύ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 278

Good call Artemis. thanks Raleigh I'll get back to you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nico353184

For me (a Brit) "The glass of water" is a glass containing water (a glassful of water). Surely that would be το ποτήρι νερό ?

All the entertaining explanations above seem to be saying that το ποτήρι του νερού is a water-glass (what the French call "un verre à eau" rather than a "verre d'eau") and would, by default, be empty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 278

The Greek refers to the glass you would normally serve water in. Thanks teopap for the table setting. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nico353184

Thanks for the confirmation. Somebody perhaps ought to remove "The glass of water" as a approved translation. In fact, it looks like you already did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoflasche

i think "Το ποτήρι νερού" is a better choice for "the water glass". to me "Το ποτήρι του νερού" sounds like "the water's glass" although it is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teopap2

Word-to-word translation is the water's glass, of course.
There are several ways to convey the meaning "water glass":

  • ποτήρι του νερού (common)
  • ποτήρι νερού (to me, it sounds a bit less natural)
  • ποτήρι για νερό (για=for)
  • νεροπότηρο (compound word; common, informal)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 278

Exactly, fine grammar and great explanations. Thanks a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoflasche

thanks, especially for "νεροπότηρο".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philipduerdoth

That sounds the same construction as καρεκλοπόδαρα (chairlegs)

I must start a list of compound nouns like these. The correct stress looks as if it might be tricky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teopap2

I think a lot of these compound words are stressed in the third syllable from the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fakename014

So that's a thing in Greece, is it? They have glasses designated for water-use only?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teopap2

It isn't a thing in Greece only: take a look here.

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