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"Με φαντάζεσαι;"

Translation:Can you imagine me?

September 25, 2016

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djzeus01

Perhaps a translation difficulty? This doesn't seem to make sense in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995
Mod
  • 171

It's more like "Can you imagine me (doing...)?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jfbecks17

so I'm getting the sense that some verbs in Greek, while conjugated in the passive voice, have an active meaning in English. Is that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Yes a big group of Greek verbs are conjugated in passive but have an active voice. Some call them medio-passive verbs. The maybe most common verb to be/ είμαι belong to this group. To become is a better example because it has the ordinary endings in all persons: γίν-ομαι, γίν-εσαι, γίν-εται, γιν-όμαστε, γίν-εστε, γίν-ονται.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deryckchan

Yes. Grammarians (particularly those who study both ancient and modern Greek) say Greek has "active" vs "medio-passive". "Medio" refers to the "middle voice" where one does something that primarily affects oneself. Hence a lot of English intransitive verbs line up with Greek middle voice (or "passive conjugation with active meaning") like come <-> έρχομαι, become <-> γίνομαι and so on. You can find a lot more guidance by searching "Greek middle voice".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

How about "Are you imagining me?" (as in imagining that I exist).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robert672165

Fantasmagorical. I am imaginary anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snekre

It's not weirder than some of the other sentences on Duolingo. Useless, but perfectly valid otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod

    It's not useless actually, you'll hear it more often than you'd probably expect in Greek, most likely accompanied with a tone of incredulousness. Also, "Το φαντάζεσαι;!" which is probably most accurately translated as "Imagine that!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gal52

    με doesnt mean with?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PagonaLioni

    we have two ''με'' in greek. the first one is the one you mention, meaning with. The second one is the short accusative form of first person personal pronoun εμένα-με (me), eg he called me -> πήρε εμένα (τηλέφωνο) or με πήρε (τηλέφωνο).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheEnglishAugust

    As a sentence in English it is incomplete, as others have rightly mentioned.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niko837328

    Do you imagine me. Is absolutely a complete English sentence. It might sound less strange if you swap out one or both of the pronouns in the sentence, but gramatically it is absolutely a complete and normal english sentece.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithAndre18

    Yes, agreed. And maybe you have to contort and twist to come up with a factual context where it would fit, but I think you can. Like, say, "I am here in person but you are treating me like a ghost or spirit."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hafizen

    In English the first person pronoun is not used: Reported as: My answer should have been accepted.

    These are the hints offered:
    .

    Thanks!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanessaGor47801

    Do you dream about me?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
    Mod
    • 269

    Do you dream about me is "Ονειρεύεσαι εμένα;"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodneyMarsh261

    You imagine me? (Question through intonation) not accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

    It generally isn't, here on Duo.

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