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"Gli effetti sono molto strani."

Translation:The effects are very strange.

4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Artilyz

Sooo, drugs huh?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saveTheGopher

Slightly confused why it is 'molto' and not 'molti'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flieu
flieu
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it's "molto" because the translation of "very" is "molto"

the translation of "many" is "molti".

"molti" is for a numerical issue.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saveTheGopher

Ah, right. Thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrSunshine251

Mos, you superstar! Thanks for that explanation. I'd give you a lingot if I wasn't on my mobile :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcounts
dcounts
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Thanks for clearing that up. Love the photo of the Matterhorn. Spent 3 winters in Zermatt.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teresinha
Teresinha
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In this case, "molti" is an adverb, therefore is invariable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BampaOwl
BampaOwl
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Correct, @Teresinha, except that you mean "molto", not "molti". "Molto" as an adverb ("very") can apply to an adjective or another adverb - though not, in this case, a verb! And as you say, it is invariable. But "molto" can also be an adjective ("much", or "many" in plural), in which case it agrees in gender and number with its noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teresinha
Teresinha
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Thanks fot the correction. You are right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jean_Vu
Jean_Vu
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There's an article explaining the use of "molto" and when it doesn't change: http://blogs.transparent.com/italian/how-to-use-molto/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coquito38

There is misspelled word. Estrange instead of Strange. Can you correct this. Thank you

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Kinsey
Alex_Kinsey
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Estrange is not misspelt, it is a different word to strange. But it is wrong in this context, so the hint should be changed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jean_Vu
Jean_Vu
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I don't see any misspelled words in my comment? If you're talking about the article, I'm not the owner.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindso3487

If the correct word to use is "strange," then why doesn't it list that as a possible meaning for the word "strani?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shoemaker_Levy-9
Shoemaker_Levy-9
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Is there another word for "unusual"? It didn't take it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jae633849

A volte ti fa venir sonno, a volte potrebbe farti vedere dei mostri a sette teste...

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrediLaris
FrediLaris
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I have read the comments and want to write, that I have used the "estrange" word, becouse this word was there on 1-st place for helping me, but it was not good (English is not my native language). Perhabs it is the lapse?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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"estranged" is a verb which means "to become strangers", i.e., "not to know or recognize each other from this point in time". It has nothing to do with "weird" or "odd".

"Strange" and "estrange" are essentially "false friend cognates" - In US English, "strange" always means "weird" or "odd", while "estrange(d)" always means "to no longer recognize or know who someone is". "Estrange(d)" is used exclusively to refer to people who once were close (family members, husbands and wives, very close friends) but have become separated in thought, circumstance, emotion, etc., for any number of reasons - a family quarrel, a divorce, etc., all of which center in some kind of dispute.

"Strange" and "Estrange" have a cognate in French, "Etranger", which means "foreigner" or "stranger". In this regard, "stranger" as a noun does not mean "weird", it simply means "not known or recognized", so "strange" (adjective = weird) and "stranger" (noun = unknown) also are false friend cognates.

The link is that someone who is foreign often has habits or an appearance which is different from what local people are used to (i.e., is "strange"), and that "foreigner" (i.e., "stranger") can speak, do things, or dress in ways which seem odd, peculiar or even weird to the local population. Thus "strange" (originally meaning "foreign") came to be synonymous with "weird".

There is one thing to look out for: "stranger" as a comparative rather than a noun. "He is more strange than she is" = "He is stranger than she is". "He" and "she" can know each other very well and be best friends, and thus not be "strangers" to each other, but "He is very weird and she is only a little weird, so he is stranger (more strange) than she is."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilimayu

the right word is strange, I think there is a mistake in Duolingo,i am going to report it. And you can do the same

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BampaOwl
BampaOwl
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There is,as DL suggests, an English verb "estrange". But the only time you are likely to see it is as the past participle " estranged", e.g. "estranged wife". DL's hint here is very confusing and wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/helena222222

"gli" for one person?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllieStani

If anyone can follow to get my next badge I'd be very grateful!

6 months ago