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https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

What is "Gaelige"? (Not Gaeilge)

Was on Facebook earlier and saw "Gaelige" as a language option.

Is this a misspelling of Gaeilge?

Does it refer to another language instead of Irish?

Is it béarlachas?

4
1 year ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Gaelige” is a misspelling of Gaeilge, probably influenced by the spelling of Gael.

Before the spelling reform, Gaeilge was spelled Gaedhilge ; it used to be only the genitive form, with a nominative form of Gaedhealg and a dative form of Gaedhilg. The Munster nominative form was Gaedhlaing, hence its reformed spelling Gaelainn. In Donegal, the nominative form was Gaedhilic ; I suspect that the latter form is the source of why “Irish” is still often called “Gaelic” in North America.

8
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

“Gaelige” is a misspelling of Gaeilge, probably influenced by the spelling of Gael.

I would have thought that it's a misspelling based on a stray epithenetic vowel - the vowel is there in some Irish people's pronunciation of Gaeilge as "Gaelige". Anyone familiar enough with pre-reform spellings to be influenced by them is probably not likely to make this type of spelling mistake - it's far more likely that whoever was responsible for this example was influenced by the sound than by 70 year old spellings.

And the prevalence of the term "Gaelic" in North America is probably more likely due to the influence of groups with names like the Gaelic League and the Gaelic Athletic Association, names that came from Ireland.

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windsaw

Well, in Germany, "Gälisch" is the default name for the irish language for all those who don't know better. Which is why in correct media it is usually called "Irisch-Gälisch" to avoid any confusion. There doesn't seem to be any particular reason why most people call it that way. It seems to be historical, even though it is incorrect.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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My thought wasn’t that Facebook Gaelige Person based the misspelling on any pre-reform spelling; rather, that the “Gaelige” misspelling was based on the current spelling of Gael (the pre-reform spelling of Gael was Gaedheal).

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Sorry, I somehow misread your Gaedhilge as Gaedhlige and thought you were suggesting that as the source of this particular error.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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Well in school we always spell it as Gaelige. I'm not sure if it's just based on the Irish dialect you're learning though...

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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If it's supposed to be an Irish word, it would violate the "caol le caol agus leathan le leathan" rule (ae is considered broad), so it's very unlikely to be a dialectal spelling. Probably just a misspelling.

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThDonaghey
ThDonaghey
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ae is considered broad? Can you give a source for this? If it's true, there must be quite a lot of violations of that rule (including archaic spellings like Gaedhilge and Gaedhilic)!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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Basically any source covering the (post-reform) spelling rules. For starters, try this page in GnaG: http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/ortho.htm#weit

ae: this is a long e [e:] (most not [æ:]). While and despite the appearance of an e, it is considered broad! It is treated almost as one single letter. (prior to the spelling reform it was written "aedhea" e.g. in Gaedheal > Gael).

If you want the following consonant to be slender, that's written aei today (as in Gaeilge or traein).

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

Could it be a regional spelling? Teanglann turns up nothing....

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/_search/gaelige

I haven't been focusing on a single dialect. Being from the west coast of the United States it would seem disingenuous for me to pick and choose or to attempt to represent any single dialect.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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Whether you make an active decision or not, at least for your pronunciation you're likely to automatically learn a specific dialect (probably the one to which you get the most exposure).

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

I agree with you and it's bound to happen. I just don't want to intentionally narrow my focus when learning a new language.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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I don't think picking a dialect automatically narrows your focus. Even though I'm trying to keep my active Irish reasonably consistent now (like most people, I started with a wild mix of all dialects, which is still there to a certain degree), I still want to passively understand all the major dialects, and I find the differences between them very interesting anyway. So I don't ignore the other dialects, but I often look up at the same time how "my" dialect would say it.

It's kind of like I handle dialects in my native language: I don't intend to speak other dialects usually, but I understand them and know the major differences, and if necessary I could probably make an attempt to adapt my speech a bit for a speaker of the other dialect.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

I guess the other big challenge for me is a lack of opportunities to speak it. The nearest language group I've found is an hour away from me. I also don't have any contacts over in Ireland to practice with.

1
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Could it be a regional spelling? Teanglann turns up nothing....

It's 100% a misspelling.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucguillou

scottish gaelic may be

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andywolfma
Andywolfma
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Irish in Scottish Gaelic is Gàidhlig na h-Èirinn, whilst Scottish Gaelic is Gàidhlig, so it's not Scots Gaelic, to answer your question.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

Thank you for the information on Scottish Gaelic! Curious what it is in Manx...

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kittycat5moon

i dont think so. probably a misspelling or glitch

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Is this a misspelling of Gaeilge?

Yes. 100%

1
Reply1 year ago