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  5. "Ο ζωολογικός κήπος στην πόλη…

"Ο ζωολογικός κήπος στην πόλη μου έχει ένα γεράκι."

Translation:The zoo in my city has a hawk.

September 30, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

Zoological Gardens not yet added to this sentence. Zoos were originally planned as gardens which had the added attraction of animals. if the zoo is called a zoological gardens the chances are it was established in the first half of the 19C.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 275

Yes, sorry I have added it only in the singular as the Greek is singular. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

You raised a question in my mind, is it singular or plural? I checked it out and it seems both singular and plural are correct but the singular is more common. London and Dublin are in the plural but lots of others are singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 275

Yes, it's one of the expressions that do that. Thanks for the examples.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

I've been dinged for writing hawk instead of falcon for this animal in some sentence, where both are suggested.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

Yes, that is a tricky one. As a bird watcher I have a list of birds giving, Latin,Greek and English translations. Γεράκι according to this is used as a generic name for lots of different birds of prey. I don’t have the list with me here but from memory I think you are probably right. In the village they use diminutives for the smaller birds of prey and γεράκι for a long legged buzzed who nests in the valley.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

Somewhere here is a discussion we had about how (most) Americans can't distinguish a rabbit (κουνέλι) from a hare (λαγός), so call them all rabbits. Often a hare is a jackrabbit. But i think hares are more common in Europe, so people know the difference (I had the same problem while living in Denmark, where the Easter Bunny is Påskehare.) But here I noticed that frogs and toads are all βάτραχος, which according to my dictionary is a frog, while a toad is φρύνος!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

Yes and fish are a nightmare. I believe the European Commission was faced with a big problem naming fish which have different names in many European problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

Also possibly town instead of city. Some people call their large city 'town', as in London town, or down town. Others want their small town to be a city. So both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

I’m surprised that happened, it must be a glitch because in my experience Duo always accepts either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon345104

So hawk and falcon are the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

"Yes", as far as translating them is concerned, but, effectively, they're not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 275

That's so true. If you look in any Greek English dictionary for "γεράκι" will give "hawk" and/or "falcon". But actually, they are not the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

That must drive birders insane!

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