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  5. "Η πίτσα έχει τυρί και τομάτα…

"Η πίτσα έχει τυρί και τομάτα."

Translation:The pizza has cheese and tomato.

October 5, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenbal4

Are there any English speakers who would say "tomato" here? I put tomatoes.. that's what's natural in my area at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teopap2

In Greek, when you talk about the ingredients in a dish but you don't specify the quantity used, you use the singular. For example, the plural of this sentence would be: "Οι πίτσες έχουν τυρί και ντομάτα".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 326

I've added "tomatoes" to the accepted answers. This a bit grammatically indefinite, Is it a general idea or specific. But we have the choice so I think it's ok, now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sahar1966

Why ντομάτα is written τομάτα ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 326

Both are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PorkezPork

So cheesecake is τσιζκεικ, but cheese is τυρι?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 326

Yes, τσιζκεικ is a loan word and uses the English word. Τυρί is the normal Greek word for cheese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil682961

And we still have a trace of τυρί in English - in the second half of the word butter.

(As well as mostly scientific words like 'tyrosine' etc)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PorkezPork

Ευχαριστω


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie586723

Isn't tomato ντομάτα??? Not with taf ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 326

Both τομάτα και ντομάτα are correct. "ντομάτα" is in fact more common. Please try not to use a mass of question marks we are quite ready and willing to reply to your every question without these mulitiple emphatic symbols.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlaviaVecc2

One question: why is 'και' pronounced hier like 'ki' and in almost most cases displayed in the course 'kie'? Or is it me who is mistaken in listening??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

When preceding an /e/ (and an /i/), "κ" makes this sound. The tongue touches the palate, whereas in /ka/, /ko/, /ku/, it doesn't.

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