Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/natella875

i think russian is really hard anyone else think so

Russian language

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Goobertron

My wife tried explaining to me why it's шесть машин and not шесть машины and I still don't get it so ya. Удачи. Like all good things in life it takes a lot of work.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arcusimpetus

"why it's шесть машин and not шесть машины"

Because Russian, that's why.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zeitschleifer
Zeitschleifer
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 758

You already sound like a native speaker!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilverCharacter
SilverCharacter
  • 20
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 445

I agree that Russian can be difficult at times like any new language. I know you can find a way to make it stick for you. Here are some websites you may find useful:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimonocrazy
kimonocrazy
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4

Yeah, the grammar is hard, but I think with practice you will be able to learn it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J_Tchaikovsky
J_Tchaikovsky
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 22
  • 20
  • 20
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 430

нет! Ruso para mi, es pan comido . Piece of cake anyway :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arcusimpetus

Though I do think that the Russian language is, in general, murderously difficult, I do have to concede that there are some things in Russian that are much easier than in English (though very few things). Off the top of my head:

It's easy and intuitive to form indirect questions.

No special forms or word order for forming questions.

Very easy to predict pronunciation from spelling.

No subjunctive mood!

No articles.

That's about it. I would say that Russian doesn't have strong/weak verb distinctions, but it does have perfective/imperfective pairs; and remembering them, I think, is harder than remembering which verbs are strong and which are weak in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 43

Sorry to disabuse you of point 4 :(

See the comment by estreets here in particular: http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/subjunctive-vs-conditional.1894206/

Well, forming it is straightforward :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arcusimpetus

Ah, but here we've encountered a semantic issue that grammarians disagree about: what exactly constitutes the subjunctive mood? Is it just the way and context in which a verb is used, or is it a special ending?

For example, French and Latin unequivocally have subjunctive moods. French, "pouvoir"; Latin, "posse" ("to be able"). For the indicative, mood (for stating actual facts) you would say "je peux" and "possum" respectively ("I am able."). But for the subjunctive, there are unique forms, e.g., "Que je puisse !" and "Possim!" (roughly: "that I were able!"). As you can see, these languages have unique subjunctive forms.

In fact there is (barely) something like this in English. For "to be," in the past subjunctive mood, the conjugation is, for all persons and numbers, "were." You would say "If I were able" (not "was") and "if he were able" (not the indicative "was"). But this is a really niche case, and, in fact, some people argue that English doesn't really have a subjunctive mood: http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/02/does-english-have-subjunctive/

But, as you know, Russian doesn't have a special verb form for any person or number when using an verbs to express hypothetical. To form an irreal statement in Russian, you use бы + normal verb in the past tense, conjugated as normal for gender and number.

If you like, I can emend my previous point 4 to: "Russian conditional sentences are easy to form."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 43

Haha, leave your sentence as you like!

But Russian irreal statements aren't (necessarily) in the past tense ;) They just contain the past tense verb forms! And if a past tense verb form isn't actually in the past tense, then it has to be something else :) [actually matches up with the "if I were" quite nicely]

Adding the бы yields a special verb form, no? A similar claim for English would be that it doesn't have a future because you just add "will" to the infinitive.

I think the idea that the existence of subjunctive being dependent on a specific conjugation makes about as much sense as saying that French just doesn't have subjunctive for singular conjugations of -er verbs.

Of course, a lot of this comes down to trying to force non-Latin grammars into a schema developed for Latin with Latin nomenclature. Latin is synthetic, so of course its moods are expressed in endings. Other languages are less synthetic. They still have the moods.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Black_Russian

Нет! )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreeDebreu

The more you like it the better you will be! : ) ( 好きこそものの上手なれ )

2 years ago