"He did not want to eat."

Translation:Él no quiso comer.

5 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes

No quiso comer would translate as he refused to eat. Preterite has some way stronger meanings in some verbs

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nivkotzer
Nivkotzer
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Is preterite the regular past tense?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/memorare

Yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carj13

Can someone please tell me why sometimes you need 'de' in front of the infinite and sometimes not. Thanks.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WChorneau

Why isn't this "Él no quería comer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rad0

This is what i put and it was accepted

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes

well, it depends on the verb. tratar de + infinitive is just the way to say to try to do that activity. Yo trato de explicar esto. dejar de + infinitive = to quit doing something (usually a habit) Voy a dejar de fumar. Deber (alone) + infinitive = to should do that activity. Ud. debe deletrear con cuidado. Whereas, Deber de + infinitive = to probably be doing that activity. Marco debe de llegar pronto. Marco will probably be arriving soon.

And then there are other verbs that just go with "a" to be the complete thought. Aprendo a hablar espanol. Te ayudo a aprender.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire
CasiquirePlus
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It sounds like an easier way to remember deber is to think of deber as should and deber de as should be.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/casalily

Sorry this isn't about the sentence itself. I've just completed the section on modal verbs without having the slightest idea what I'm doing. Can someone tell me if there's anywhere on this site that gives a simple, or even a complicated, explanation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna.Christensen

Thanks for that link. I also didn't understand modal verbs even though i can do most of the exercises!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichelleP3
MichelleP3
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I would love a link to anywhere that can help me with this. I dunno if modal verbs have another name but I can't seem to find anything helpful on the internet. Maybe my brain is just too broken from trying to figure this out

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

Verbos modales = modal verbs. You should find plenty websites

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miajav
miajav
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Could one use the imperfect "queria" here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LSadun
LSadun
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I just did, and it was accepted (1/2018). I think it has a somewhat different nuance than quiso, as zopilotes pointed out.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larrimus

Why isn't there a que between quiso & comer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

Because in Spanish you don't translate "to" when it refers to the infinitive form of a verb. In other words, to eat= comer. To run= correr. To live= vivir.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hughmcjr
Hughmcjr
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the overall issue with duolingo...its about progression but somehow there is a disconnect...one exercise and one can get everything right...perfect...the next it is like you knew nothing in terms of structure, grammar etc even if you are bilingual. I get the program is trying to teach analytical thinking but something is off.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crtrahan

Why not "Él no quiso a comer."? Other translators accept it. When is 'a' appropriate.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chrizzy26

Quiso ??????

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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This chronically inconsistent translator make me want to go on a cussing and shouting spree. Sometimes an "a" or a "de" is required between the future tense and the infinitive form of the verb. Since the rule is applied so inconsistently, how the hell is anyone expected to know when to use one of these (and which one to use) and when not to?

"Sometimes you do and sometimes you don't" or "it depends" are both piss-poor explanations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Sometimes they are the only explanations. Stop worrying about rules. The only thing that is guaranteed to work is "monkey see monkey do." Just practice more. For example watch a Spanish movie 100 times.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl1
Cheryl1
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Without specific examples it is not possible to answer your question. This sentence is not in the future but in the past tense. In this sentence the infinitive form of the verb ''comer'' translates as ''to eat'' therefore you don't need to use ''a'' (to). To say ''a comer'' would translate literally to ''to to eat''. Quiso (he / she / it wanted) is the past tense of querer (to want). English infinitives are easily recognized because they are preceded by the word ''to''. Spanish infinitives can be recognized by one of 3 endings (-ar, -er, -ir). They translate to ''to xxxxxx''.

The prepostion ''de'' is often used in prepositional phrases such as ''antes de'' (before), cerca de (near) además de (besides). There are hundreds of compound phrases that us ''de''. You learn them as you go. For your reference: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=de

3 years ago
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