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  5. "You go to bed."

"You go to bed."

Translation:Você vai para a cama.

February 8, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delvi

Why is "Você vai à cama." not correct? Why should it be para and not à?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erudis
  • 2554

I'm not sure if it's grammatically incorrect, but it sounds quite strange to me. It sounds like "cama" is a place, rather than an object, when you say it like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delvi

ok. obriagada, Erudis. So, "à" is used more for speaking of a place (store, work, library) where one is going, rather than a piece of furniture (couch, chair, table, bed) to which one is going?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erudis
  • 2554

Yes (à / ao, depending on the gender). To objects, people usually say "vá até a/o + object", although this expression is also commonly used for places.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aykutkafka

Você vai à cama should be correct I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

"Ir para" is the standard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aykutkafka

Yes but not always I guess because a or à/ao is also used and accepted. how can we be sure about when to use which?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

It depends on the situation. "Ir a" is used with countries, cities, towns and other physical locations ("Ir ao banco" - go to the bank; "Ir ao supermercado" - go to the supermarket), and that also includes metonymic locations - cases where the job of the person you're seeing ends up acting as a reference to the place they work in; e.g. Ir ao médico - "go to the doctor"; Ir ao barbeiro - "go to the barber". The idea it carries is that you'll go there, but you'll eventually go somewhere else.

"Ir para" has a stronger sense of finality, usually with the sense of going somewhere and staying there for a while. It can also be used for physical locations when you're staying and not just visiting (Ir ao Brasil nas férias vs. Ir para o Brasil trabalhar). It's this idea that distinguishes "Ir a casa", which implies you'll go there for a bit or to perform some errand, but that you'll leave later; from "Ir para casa", which implies that you don't have plans later. The same train of thought that be extended extended to other words like "quarto":

  • Perdi o meu celular! Vou ao meu quarto ver se o encontro. I lost my phone! I'll go to my room to see if I left it there.
  • Depois do jantar, fui para o meu quarto e acabei os deveres da escola. After dinner, he went to my room and I finished my homework.

Technically, this could also be extended to "cama", but there aren't many instances where you'd need to "go to your bed" just for a while (probably would only come up when you need to pick up something you left there); in any case, "Ir para a cama" means "To go to bed" (with the intention of sleeping - or not - but what matters is that you'll stay there for a while).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aykutkafka

Ok.. This was a great explanation :) Muito obrigado.. I understood the difference much better now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomislavSt6

Wow. Your comment is like a complete lesson. Made things much clearer to me. Thanks for the effort and have an upvote and two lingots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moley0603

Thank you for this most helpful clarification and please accept a Lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alanija

why is "para a cama" another correct solution? I thought that para already includes the "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

I think you're confusing "para" (a standalone preposition, i.e., which can't be contracted with other prepositions) and "pela" (a contraction of por + a).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leoroschi

I said "vocé vai pra a cama" and it took it as a wrong answer, i'm pretty sure it's just the same, can someone tell me if that's right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erudis
  • 2554

I don't know if there's a rule, but we never say "pra + a". If we abbreviate "para", the article goes away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arthurworst

could this sentence be a command (imperative)? If not, how would you say it that way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"Vá para a cama."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicki961

Is pra wrong? Maybe it's because I'm mineira and tend to cut words but I always thought it was. A legitimate word to replace to 'para a'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"Pra" is informal and should not be used in written language.

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