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  5. "Το ξενοδοχείο είναι κοντά στ…

"Το ξενοδοχείο είναι κοντά στο δρόμο."

Translation:The hotel is near the road.

October 9, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrauFrana

I wonder if the στον marked wrong was due to the use of verb to be, not considering near the road as an object in accusative case, but as adverbial complement. However, as a Portuguese speaker, I may be completely wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 316

"στον" is one of the accepted translations. Therefore, if your sentence was rejected it wasn't because of that.

Why was it rejected? You had an error, but we have no way of know what it was since we have no way of seeing what you wrote...and one word doesn't help at all.

You should have made a report.

TIPS TO MAKE LEARNING EASIER + HOW TO REPORT A PROBLEM…..

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/22424028

And check out the Greek Forum here with more links.

https://forum.duolingo.com/topic/936


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon345104

Has the v been dropped from στον


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes. According to current grammar taught in schools, it should not have been dropped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenjaminDe540650

Why is the neuter δρόμο used here for 'the road' while earlier exercises used the masc. ο δρόμος?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

τον δρόμο is the accusative case of ο δρόμος.

The preposition σε requires the accusative case. (στον = σε + τον)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Junec177

To be clear, the v been dropped from στον due to an old rule. δρόμο is the accusative, masculine form of δρόμος and "στο δρόμο" derives from "στον δρόμο"

However, though technically incorrect now, this rule is still commonly heard/used (where the ν is dropped due to the following consonant of the word). You still probably will hear it spoken like this by some native speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liza618326

What is difference between: beside, near= δίπλα, κοντά???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 316

"beside" means "next to" "on the side" in other word on the left or right). "near" means "close to" it can be "in front", "in back", or "next to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LCincinnatus

Maybe it is impossible to allow, but writing στον (which I gather is correct nowadays) gets marked as incorrect on the listening exercise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 316

We can't add anything to the Listenin exercise since it is one part of the course that is administered through the Duolingo database, not our incubator, and only one version is allowed.

On written exercises you can of course use either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilSimmonds

'the hotel is near to the road' you must allow this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 316

The dictionaries I've consulted show that "near" means 'distance from' while "near to" is used for a state or conditions e.g. "This topic is near to his heart." Merriam-Webster, .cambridge.org etc. But I must concede that "near to a place" has become quite commonly used so we'll include it as an alternative. Thank you for you contribution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"near to the road" sounds wrong to me, like something a non-native speaker would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btberg

Normally, a native speaker would not use the preposition "to" along with "near". If the meaning is intended to be that the hotel is immediately to the side of the road, "next to" could also be used "The hotel is next to the road", though in Greek this would be δίπλα στο δρόμο.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 316

Yes, we are in agreement "near to" is not used for distances as you'll see in my post above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

I'm non-native and I would never ever say "near to"!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 316

Ιn the 3 years since I posted the comment above I've had a change of heart. After a good deal of reading and consulting with other native English speakers it seems that "near to" can be used.

I guess it's a regional thing. I don't think I'd ever use.

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