https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phea

Rules for accusative case

What is the accusative case?

This is the noun that is the receiver of the action, ie. what the verb acts on like Die Frau kauft den Computer (Der Computer changes to Den Computer.)

Overview:

Both the definite article(the/that) and indefinite article(a/an) change only for masculine nouns. Here is the general overview

Definite: den Mann | die Frau | das Kind | die Gäste

Indefinite: einen Mann | eine Frau | ein Kind | - Gäste

Negative: keinen Mann | keine Frau | kein Kind | keine Gäste

Possessive: meinen Mann | meine Frau | mein Kind | meine Gäste

March 3, 2012

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrynMarie

Actually, in the case of "Jungs," 'den' implies the dative case. Think back to your first German lessons: "Wie geht es DIR?" "Es geht MIR gut!" As you can see, the construction "es gehen" goes with the Dative case. This case is no different.

September 2, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cocalarix

Thank you for this.

March 24, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waynedou

Thank you! How to explain the sentence of "Den Jungs geht es gut"? "Den" implies accusative case, however it seems that "Jungs" is the subject.

May 10, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jennjeffs

Does every sentence have an accusative case (word)?

February 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThyraSinisalo

Not necessarily, there are sentences without objects as well as sentences with Dative objects.

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caileen7

Isn't there some rule about when the sentence is a sentence like an equal sign (ie: Joe is a man), then the accusative is NOT used? (so then "Joe ist EIN Mann") I think this applies to "sein" and a few other verbs, but I'm not sure. Does anyone know if this is true and, if so, what those other verbs are? Thanks!

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thayyne

This is quite late, and I'm not well versed in German grammar, but here goes: In English, "man" in that sentence is not a direct object, but a predicate nominative; the accusative case is the same as a direct object English, which is most likely why "ein" is used instead of "einen."

April 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathan.edvalson

They use an example of Danke in the description, is Danke not a verb that requires the dative rather than the accusative to follow after?

April 21, 2013
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