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"Water is running into the kitchen."

Translation:Wasser läuft in die Küche.

February 8, 2013

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jloris

How would you distinguish "Water is running into the kitchen" vs. "Water is running in the kitchen" auf Deutsch? These have two very different meanings in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philster043

Probably accusative form vs dative form. "Wasser läuft in die Küche" would be accusative, meaning the water is moving into the kitchen. "Wasser läuft in der Küche" would be dative, meaning the water is already somewhere in the kitchen. Just my guess though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oqughuchi

philster is absolutely correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muitosabao

You are most likely right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pauLiou

Why not Wasser rennt in die Küche?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8KAITO8

I also want to know why rennt cant be used :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

Simply because you don't use this word with liquids. They "laufen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnMacDon586955

German has a general term for 'to run' which is laufen, and a specific term which is rennen, tears laufen, people laufen. People rennen, but tears don't rennen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eey91

Can wasser "rennt in die Küche" or only "läuft"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helge.
  • 1023

Water can not run. It doesn't have legs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dalina_plesu

why ist the article die different in these two sentences : Ich komme nicht in die Kuche? and Die Flasche ist in der Kuche? I do not see a difference between them..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crush

See philster043's comment above, the accusative (in die Küche) shows that there is movement from outside the kitchen into the kitchen. Ich komme in die Küche means i am outside the kitchen going in. The dative case (in der Küche) shows that it is in the kitchen and stays in the kitchen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mnarhins

There's a big difference between "Ich komme in die Küche" and "Ich komme in der Küche".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dalina_plesu

Thank you very much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jramirezf

Check Christian's link, it clarifies everything


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catonano

so there´s some water, presumably on the floor, drifting towards the kitchen ? That´s how I understand it. Maybe because a pipe broke up and the house is being flooded ? Theese sentences seem so weird to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oqughuchi

Or it could be raining a lot, and water is overflowing outside and running into the kitchen. Seems like a perfectly normal sentence to me, for what it's worth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dashadog

How about "Wasser läuft die Küche hinein."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathryn462585

lauft vs rennt Machts Nichts!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poncho936779

Isn't it: In der Küche ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scorbett

If the question was "water is running in the kitchen", then yes, you'd be correct. Like, you left the kitchen tap running or something. But the question says "water is running into the kitchen", which requires accusative case "in die Küche" to convey motion. It's a weird question because I can't picture a scenario where water is going to be running into a kitchen. Maybe a flood or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffrey.al

I imagined it was coming from the faucet which is already in the kitchen. Would this change anything regarding which case to use?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renata862598

See philster043 answer above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renata862598

I wrote "Wasser läuft in die Küche über", understanding that it is going into and over the kitchen floor. Is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

The "über" is superfluous and doesn't make sense here. I understand your thought, but grammatically this is not possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul822105

Does "rennt" not work in this context in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

No, you can't use "rennen" for liquids. It is "laufen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drex450886

Why can you not use "rennt" instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

This has already been answered. You can't use "rennen" for the movement of liquids.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgde

I used rennt and it was incorrect. Is the verb laufen more for just movement in general? Could I say for example: "Milch läuft in die Tasse"? - "Milk is running into the cup."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

Yes, you can use "laufen" for movement of liquids (not any movement in general). But you can't use "rennen" for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris_y1190

Why can't we use "rennen" as in "Wasser rennt in die Kuche"? It was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Capital_Ash

Shouldnt it be "der küche" as "in" changes the word after it to the dativ case? I know im wrong here and i would appreciate a correction

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