"Tu es mon peuple."

Translation:You are my people.

6 years ago

82 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gtmckee

Am I wrong in assuming that 'tu' is singular? If it is singular, 'people' would not be accurate.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

A bit bizarre, I agree. But why not, as part of a political speech: "France, you are my country, you are my nation, you are my people" = "France, tu es mon pays, tu es ma nation, tu es mon peuple" (pretty arrogant, isn't it?)

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lumna
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 5
  • 3

I think I have understood: the difference is : "tu" if I consider peuple as a whole ,, "vous" as a set of individuals In English family, team follow this rule and are followed by a singular or a plural verb. Anyway France, tu es mon pays is grammatically bizzare, but very striking in a political speech. it's a "figure de style". The problem is that in an an out-of-contest exercise it is very tricky and rather annoying for the learner. :-). Anyway it's the use that determine the language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

Agreed on all fronts!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lumna
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 5
  • 3

thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magicalhobo
  • 18
  • 16
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4

Your sentence makes sense only because in English "you" is also plural. If you use a singular pronoun, it's awkward... "France, she is my country, she is my nation, she is my people."

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

In that case, the French say: "La France, c'est mon pays, ma nation, mon peuple". And if a pronoun is necessary: "Elle".

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reavenk
  • 15
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 12

Wait, same thing; then why is it mon instead of mes?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneNussbaum

Notice that the French noun for "people" (or think of it as equivalent to "population") is masculine: le peuple, mon peuple. (Do you know Latin: populus, -i, m.?) In English, by contrast, "people" is construed as a plural: "The people are angry, they are rioting," etc. In French, using the noun "peuple," the verbs and pronouns would be singular:"Le peuple va tuer le roi et la reine!!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lumna
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 5
  • 3

If i understand right, since peuple is singular, you don not say "vous" but " tu" ? when addressing to a crowd of listeners, to an audience, to a nation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

Addressing a crowd, your people or anonymous people, you will always use "vous".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneNussbaum

The choice of "tu" or "vous," for languages lucky enough to (still) have them, must depend on who the addressee is. In Sitesurf's example, "la France" was being apostrophized, and the country can thus (apparently) be thought of as a singular entity (as opposed to "vous, les Français").

This is a lot like the example of Zion being addressed in the Isaiah passage that lpacker and rollingstock reference, below.

Or how about "America, America, God shed His grace on thee, and crown thy good in brotherhood from sea to shining sea" ? (using the English correspondents of 'tu, toi' and 'ton, ta, tes')

For rhetorical effect, can a speaker of French say something like, "ô peuple français, pourquoi as-tu fait ... ?", thus treating "peuple" as a singular entity for these purposes?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

Unless you are God. Je suis ton Dieu, et tu es mon peuple.

www.linguee.fr/francais-anglais/traduction/tu+es+mon+peuple.html

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hartgekocht

In English, we say "You are my kind of people" to individuals. If I meet someone, and they say something I really agree with, I can say "You, Dave, are my kind of people." So it does happen.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Regney
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 1837

You're correct; it's a colloquialism. If anyone is curious, you can read about it here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luders09

That is grammatically incorrect. In English you should say 'You, Dave, are my kind of person'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

I agree-- telling one person "You are my kind of people" sounds odd, since people is plural. It's like saying "Bessie, you are my kind of cows" or "Rover, you are my kind of dogs".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grimalkins
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 9

In British English, we could not say to an individual "you are my kind of people". It would have to be be "You, Dave, are my kind of man/person". "Kind of" requires the singular - a kind of dog, a kind of person.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 6
  • 5

i put this (you are my kind of person) and was marked wrong. Should I report it? I will but I'm unsure.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

you are my kind of person = tu es mon genre OR tu es mon type (de personne).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alleigh25
  • 16
  • 13
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

No, it still works. It's a collective noun, not an actual plural. You would say "My team IS my family," not "My tram ARE my family."

Changing it to she is awkward simply because that is an awkward sentence. It's no less awkward to say "Hannah, she is my sister, she is my friend."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

Not to nitpick, but I believe "My team are my family" might actually be correct in British English. I know that's true with companies. Whereas we would say "Ford is about to introduce a new model," they would say "Ford are about to release..." I'm just sayin'...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FurstWasser

Hi, should "kinsmen" be accepted here? since: noun, plural kinsmen. A person of the same nationality or ethnic group.

source: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/kinsman

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

That's mostly a biblical expression, although this French sentence does seem to be taken from the Bible, specifically, Tu es mon peuple! (Ésaïe 51:16). Although "kinsmen" is used elsewhere in the (King James) Bible, the KJV translation for this particular verse (Isaiah 51:16) is "Thou art my People"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IpsitaDas7

Difference between mon & ma?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
  • 25
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 118

Mon is used for Masculine nouns:

Mon chapeau, Mon frère etc.

But, Ma is used for Feminine nouns:

Ma chemise, Ma sœur etc.

Also note that, Mon is used for feminine nouns which start with a vowel sound to avoid vowel conflicts:

Ma + amie is changed to mon amie

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick106262

"People" can be singular. "The French are a kind and generous people"- that's talking about "a people", singular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

You are very kind and generous... ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

You wouldn't say " "The French is a kind and generous people", now, would you? And you wouldn't say, "The people of France is kind and generous", would you? Thus, even in your example, the word "people" is plural.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 20
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 45

No, it's clearly singular. The (singular) indefinite article "a" in a people is the giveaway. The verb is attaches to the subject of the sentence "The French" - and should therefore be plural: The French are X, The French are Y, The French ARE a people.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PierreGeaiun

People is singular here, like "a flock of sheep", "a government", "a family" , but I'm surprised that one would not address the nation with the formal "vous".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TWPXzem4

I just had to try it. "you are my peeps" is wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

I don't think it's wrong, it's just not accepted. :-)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Canvasian
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10

What is the difference between "gens" and "peuple" and are they both singular?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollingstock
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5

Les gens is masculine plural (there is no word "gen") and is basically the plural of la personne, e.g. when you say "There is a person in the street/ There are people in the street." Le peuple, masculine singular, is primarily used to refer to people sharing an identity, e.g. "the German people" or "we, the people of the United States."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Canvasian
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10

I thought "les personnes" was the plural of "la personne"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollingstock
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5

Sometimes yes, for example when you are counting "persons" you'd probably say "il y a cinq personnes dans la classe." But if you are talking about people as a general group, you'd probably say, "je n'aime pas ces gens."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnapeC
  • 20
  • 12
  • 7

« Tu es mon peuple » said God, to the Israelites.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lpacker
  • 25
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

I believe that "peuple" is a singular noun, so "tu es mon peuple", though it sounds strange, would be grammatically correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollingstock
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5

Yes, but with all due respect to Sitesurf's creative example of "France, tu es mon peuple," anyone who makes this statement has to be addressing a group of people, and therefore would call them vous, not tu (regardless of how fond he may be of them!) I don't mind DL's silly sentences as long as they work grammatically, but this one defies logic.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

At the risk of looking foolish for resurrecting a year-old conversation, anyone who says « France, tu es mon peuple » is facetiously addressing FRANCE, as in the personified singular soul of the nation, for the benefit of the plurality of people in the audience.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

(I also said it was a bit bizarre and pretty arrogant...)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollingstock
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5

Indeed. As Louis XIV might have said to Charles de Gaulle, "L'état, c'est moi, le peuple, c'est toi."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lpacker
  • 25
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

You are thinking like an English speaker. Again, "peuple" is a singular noun, therefore "tu" works just fine with it, whether you're addressing one person or a hundred.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollingstock
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5

I confess I am an English speaker and a French learner, but with respect, I am not thinking like an English speaker any more than you are. Whether we say "Tu es mon peuple" or "Vous êtes mon peuple," you and I are both acknowledging the basic principle, in French or in English, that the verb must agree with the subject of the sentence, in this case "tu" or "vous," not with anything that comes after it. Both sentences are grammatically possible, but only vous would be used in a logical statement. If you aren't convinced, consider a similar statement in the first person: Would you expect to hear "Nous sommes le peuple du Canada" or "Je suis le peuple du Canada"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lpacker
  • 25
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

Well, I don't know what to tell you except for it's not an error on Duolingo's part. The French translation of the Bible has God saying "tu es mon peuple," etc. It's just the way it is, as unlogical as it seems...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollingstock
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5

That was a great example, and I even found the sentence you refer to in the book of Isaiah: ". . . Cion: tu es mon peuple." It's a way of talking that's fairly unique to the Bible, and poetic, I would say. Throughout, God personifies and addresses Zion or Israel or Egypt or any of the tribes as an individual, as seen in all of the "thou arts" used even in modern English translations. But I have to compliment you on the example. I guess a French proverb that DuoLingo has taught us applies to me in this case: "Tel est pris qui croyait prendre." Et j'y reste.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lpacker
  • 25
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

Thanks Ericluftman, - I have learned so much from Duolingo - but even more from the students, like yourself. The proverb you gave is interesting: such is taken who believed to take - a rather grim assessment. I prefer to think of it as a friendly exchange of information and I hope that you will continue to contribute your knowledge to the forum. Cheers!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Both. All four forms appear in actual French: « je suis le peuple » « tu es le peuple » « nous sommes le peuple » « vous êtes le peuple ».

Robespierre: « Je suis le peuple. » L'ami de Robespierre: « Oui, tu es le peuple. »

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

If somebody thinks this is illogical, they should do a Google search of this term, tu es mon peuple. You will find that it is used as a logical statement, whether you personally like it or hate it.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
  • 22
  • 19
  • 7

How would you say "let my people go" in French?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

"laissez aller mon peuple" / "laissez passer mon peuple" / "laissez mon peuple (y) aller"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
  • 25
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 118

Sry if I'm asking this question here, because this just came back to my mind here and I remembered it right now.

Q1. I googled and couldn't find a clear answer:

To form imperative forms, only the second person plural form must be used? Or singular second person is also possible?

For example here, can we also say:

Laisses aller mon peuple?

Q2. So "laissez mon peuple aller" is grammatically wrong or it has another meaning?

Thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

There are 3 imperative forms in French:

  • for "tu": laisse !
  • for "vous": laissez !
  • for "nous": laissons !

Note that 1st group verbs (infinitive ending in -er) do not use an -s ending in 2nd person singular (laisse ! not laisses), unless it is followed by a pronoun starting with a vowel sound:

  • manges-en ! = eat some!
  • manges-y ! = eat there!

"Laisse(z) aller mon peuple !" or "Laisse(z) mon peuple (y) aller !" is possible for this sentence, because there is no explicit destination.

  • Laisse(z) mon peuple aller où il veut !
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
  • 25
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 118

Thanks

Though, nous laissons ! makes no sense to me, I think it's something like let's go in English.

Sry I think that was a typo, but your notes cost a lot for me:

manges-en ! = eat some!

that was very helpful.

I have another question here:

In the last sentence you said "Laisse(z) mon peuple aller où il veut" il refers to people, doesn't it? So is people known as a singular word? I mean in English "people" needs plural third person verb forms... people are, people have etc.

It's got a bit confusing to me," peuple" needs a third persom singular or plural form of verbs?

Sry for this long comment question...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

Sitesurf, I see why Amir_Pro is confused. French and English do not align in the usage of "people." Although it is correct in French to say "mon peuple est heureux," it is never correct in English to say "my people is happy." It would always be "my people are happy." A king could say "my kingdom is happy" or "my population is happy," but "people" is always plural in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

There is a misunderstanding here: I did not say that the imperative for "nous" was "nous laissons" (this is indicative); it is "laissons !"

  • allons ! = let's go!
  • laissons ça derrière nous ! = let's leave this behind us!
  • laisse(z)-nous tranquilles ! = leave us alone!

"Un/le peuple" is "a/the people", in the singular sense of the word.

  • mon peuple est heureux, dit le roi = "My people are happy", said the king.

"people" as a group of individuals is "les gens".

  • les gens sont heureux, comme dit mon voisin = people are happy, as my neighbor says.
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
  • 25
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 118

Oh there must be () around nous there in my previous comment, anyway big thanks for your really clear answers. I wish there was a mention system (@username) in the comments section so that we could mention moderators under comments where no moderators answer questions...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grimalkins
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 9

English does have a plural of "people". In the early seventies I delivered a magazine called "The History of the English-speaking Peoples".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ADRIANKLOS2

since "you" is ambiguous and may refer to something singular or plural, would "vous etez mon peuple" be equally acceptable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

"vous êtes mon peuple" is correct.

pronunciation: [voo zet]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane.apprend.FRE

What the hell is that supposed to mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abi198304

You are my person didnt work. Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

Because "peuple" translates to the collective noun "people," rather than the singular "person." "Personne" translates to "person."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bigdan2015
  • 25
  • 21
  • 14
  • 3

Regardless of whether "Tu es mon peuple" is correct in French, "you are my people" is an incorrect translation in English because the "tu" is singular, and therefore the "you" in English has to be toward a single person, and therefore it CANNOT be "You are my people". It can be "You are one of my people" or some such thing, but not "You are my people".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

I agree with rogercchristie. Also, the context for this sentence seems vaguely biblical and the Jewish people are frequently referred to in the singular and in the Segond translation, as "tu." In the New Testament, the church (obviously many people) is referred to as a bride. So, in that context, referring to a group of people in the singular is not unusual.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sumemon

Is this a quote from Caligula?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

It's from the Bible

Tu es mon peuple! (Ésaïe/Isaiah 51:16)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madhav_Malhotra
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I have never before heard such a sentence; it is quite unnatural in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

It's from the Bible. Isaiah 51:16: Thou art (You are) my people

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/illutale

What does that even mean?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

It's from the Bible: Hosea 2:23 (English), Osée 2:23 (French). Also, Isaiah 51:16.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BinQu1
  • 25
  • 23
  • 19
  • 18
  • 12
  • 8
  • 2
  • 13

what is the difference between PEUPLE and GENS?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

the same as between "the people" and "people"

  • le peuple de France = the people of France (group of population at country/nation level)
  • ces gens sont français = these people are French (group of individuals, no framework)
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KhalilKahw

What is this sentese supposed to mean :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

In this usage, "people" is, more or less, synonymous with "tribe." So, "Tu es mon peuple (you are my people)" basically means "you are my tribe, I am one of you."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasCAPS

Could it be "You are my kind."?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

This would back translate to "vous êtes de mon genre/espèce".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CsillaKonyha
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 8
  • 8

"People" is pular. This solution is gramatically incorrect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

https://www.duolingo.com/Reandw
  • 22
  • 11

In English, people as a group - is singular. Can also be very personal and informal, (My family, gang, team, race, nationality, etc.). Tu es mon peuple. In English, people as a collection of individual people, or a collection of groups of peoples (the people/peoples of the world) - can be either singular or plural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 6
  • 5
  • 1003

No, the word 'people' still takes the plural verb, regardless. We don't say "The people was" or "The people does", or "The people wants". In American English, it is one of those collective nouns that is always regarded as plural.

1 year ago
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.