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  5. "Από το μηδέν στο άπειρο."

"Από το μηδέν στο άπειρο."

Translation:From zero to infinity.

October 11, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Contemno_I

Άπειρο comes from "apeiron", the origin of everything according to Anaximander, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995

"Apeiron" is the Greek word for infinity. Anaximander did not invent it, he just used the pre-existing word. So I would say that Anaximander's "apeiron" comes from the word άπειρον (άπειρο in modern greek). ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FBenH

That was just Contemno's little excursus into pre-Socratic philosophy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bpolonifis

Από το μηδέν στο άπειρο και από τη Γη στο πουθενά. translates "from the zero to infinity and from earth to nowhere"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakeldon

How about "Στο άπειρο και παραπέρα."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Could you use "έως" instead of "στο"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicole966706

To infinity and beyond?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
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  • 111

That's not what the exercise says, where is 'zero'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicole966706

I quoted Toy Story and Buzz Lightyear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
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  • 111

I know that, it's the question mark that made it unclear what your point was. The Greek version of the phrase is 'Στο άπειρο κι ακόμα παραπέρα!' (Hmm google translate got it right, I guess there are many instances of it on the internet...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicole966706

I am taking note of the translation. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Languages127

miden Is it a shortened form of me den ("with not" i.e. without)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

miden Is it a shortened form of me den ("with not" i.e. without)?

No. Different vowels, to begin with.

δεν is originally from ουδέν, from ουδέ + εν "(and) not one".

μηδέν is similarly from μηδέ + εν "(and) not one".

μη and ου were both negative particles in Ancient Greek; I'm not sure exactly how they were used differently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OGavin1

Nought/naught- uk/us

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