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  5. "Mężczyzna je jabłko i chleb."

"Mężczyzna je jabłko i chleb."

Translation:A man is eating an apple and bread.

October 12, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bzakrzewsky

The man eats apple and bread can be correct too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Not really without the article before 'apple'. Before 'bread' it's not needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinAndW

How do you pronounce chleb? I'm a native English speaker, and I'm confused about that h in the middle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

IPA: /xlɛp/

For a longer moment I was confused: what 'h' in the middle? It's the first sound. Then I realized that it's true, it's not the first letter.

Basically "ch" = "h" in Polish. It's exactly the same sound, it's just a matter of orthography.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jagoda91019

CH and H used to differ in the past, now they sound the same but ortography stayed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xHarley170105x

Chleb is pronounced as "hl-eb" so u would say it as "hleb" not "ch-leb"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wussinipet

Why is 'man' written sometimes with a with symbol, & other times without that symbol, as seen above?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I guess that's the difference between "mężczyzna" and "mężczyzną". Welcome to cases. "mężczyzna" is Nominative - it's the basic, dictionary form, mostly used as the subject of the sentence, as here. "mężczyzną" is Instrumental. Apart from usages like "with a man" (z mężczyzną), it's used in sentences like "On jest mężczyzną" = He is a man.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan.K.M

"The man's eating an apple and bread" was marked wrong although it's absolutely correct. (Reported)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan.K.M

Still being marked as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NyroBear

Im having the same problem


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard.birks

The new male and female voices seem to be pronouncing jabłko dropping the Ł sound. Noticed on a couple of exercises in this module.

Sounds like jab-ko,

Otherwise, loving the new voices, much easier to tell what they're saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It is often considered hypercorrectness to actually pronounce the Ł in "jabłko". It's one of the very rare examples of 'silent letters'* in Polish.

*I mean it's just silent here, not that Ł is a silent letter in general, it is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard.birks

I didn't know that... especially as the older voices used to clearly pronounce the Ł in words like jabłko, jabłka, jabłek (etc).

I kind of knew the rule about ę at the end of verbs in particular, like lubię and gotuję, kupuję (etc)

Are there any other weird gotchas where Polish strays from its normally very rigorous rules on pronunciation ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I'd say that it's like that with a few numbers.

"pięćdziesiąt", "sześćdziesiąt", "dziewięćdziesiąt" (50/60/90) - you can ignore the 'ć' part.

"pięćset", "sześćset", "dziewięćset" (500/600/900) - sound more like "pięcet", "sześset" or even colloquially "szejset", "dziewięcet".

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