1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Greek
  4. >
  5. "Σήμερα είναι Τετάρτη."

"Σήμερα είναι Τετάρτη."

Translation:Today is Wednesday.

October 12, 2016

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hectorlqr

Does 'Τετάρτη' mean 'fourth'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod

    Correct, but keep in mind that the accent is there only when you refer to the day. For the ordinal adjective the accent is placed in the first syllable: τέταρτη.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    And similarly, "the second day" (= Monday) is Δευτέρα but "second" is δεύτερη (regular accent and ending).

    The accent shift (and alpha instead of iota as feminine adjective ending after rho) are holdovers from Ancient Greek, which have been kept in the names of the days (that have become nouns), while as regular ordinal adjectives, the declension has been regularised.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineckaK

    Yes because it is the fourth day of the week. Greeks start counting on Sunday ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
    Mod
    • 271

    When I was a child in the US it was normal to consider Sunday the first day of the week, not only among Greeks. And even now calendars start with Sunday.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineckaK

    Sorry, I wasn't trying to imply it is a strictly Greek thing. It is just the only country I am sure has it this way. For me it is normal to start the week on Monday and in Czech the days Thursday and Friday contain the words four and five.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

    I believe it's different for every country, to be honest. For French and Spanish, I do think that most days of the week are named after the planets of the solar system, and have nothing to do with numbers (If you of course exclude the words semaine and semana, that both have to do with the number 7) :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrenReiley

    Folklore tidbit: Actually, most of the days in Romance languages are named for the Roman gods (and the moon), for which the planets were also named. In English, the days are named for the equivalent Saxon gods (and the moon and sun).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
    Mod
    • 271

    Yes, of course, I wasn't challenging your statement just adding what I remembered.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gilkuja

    In Israel the days are counted starting from Sunday ("Yom Rishon"- first day) followed by the second, third etc. With Shabbat as an exception (although while the meaning is unrelated directly, it does sound similar to sheva- seven). It was derived from the biblical week described in Genesis, 1


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.Igor

    Pretty similar to Portugues by meaning ))


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dublin

    I believe that "Today it is Wednesday" is also an acceptable translation of that sentence. Please comment.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
    Mod
    • 271

    I'm afraid using both "today" and "it" would be using two subjects. As if we said: "George he is a student." It's not correct Eng. Hope that helps.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

    No, it is not a subject, σήμερα is not a noun. But the same as in English I think, and it is enough. Or as least one could say: "Η σημερινή ημέρα είναι Τετάρτη", that makes a full sentence S-V-O, but it is too long and easily "handled" :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
    Mod
    • 271

    Σήμερα/today can be either an adverb or a noun. In this case, it is the subject of the sentence. Check out these dictionaries for documentation. You'll also note sentences similar to the one in the unit. "Today is Tuesday."

    https://glosbe.com/el/en/%CF%83%CE%AE%CE%BC%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%B1 http://dictionary.sensagent.com/%CF%83%CE%B7%CE%BC%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%B1/el-en/ http://www.wordreference.com/engr/today http://www.dict.com/?t=en&set=_gren&w=today https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/today http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/today


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

    Yes, indeed, in this case its function is a noun. Usually if it is a noun, it is accompanied by the article το. This is not the case. But usually is an adverb. Take a look at: http://www.greek-language.gr/greekLang/modern_greek/tools/lexica/triantafyllides/search.html?lq=%CF%83%CE%AE%CE%BC%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%B1dq=. I think it is the same in English for "today" , but with no article in any case for it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MDR215875

    why is it not ' η Τεταρτη ' as I have missed the ' η ' out in another weekday question and told the answer was incorrect .

    Learn Greek in just 5 minutes a day. For free.