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"They are men."

Translation:Ce sont des hommes.

February 8, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lawc821

I made the same mistake, but apparently C'est or Ce sont are used before nouns while ils/elles are used before adjectives

http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tex/pdf/pro3.pdf

hope this helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SibzCrayon

That was a great resource, are there any more similar pages?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bf2010
  • 2189

Check out the grammar section of http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tex/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xx.Fachelle.xx

Thanks that's really helpful but then why do we translate he is a boy as il est un garcon shouldn't it be c'est un garcon if this is the case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

You shouldn't translate "He is a boy" as "Il est un garçon", that should indeed be "C'est un garçon". If you ever see it translated as "Il est un garçon", that is an error that should be reported through the button in the lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hilme

Hmm. Why not "Ils sont des hommes"? Why does it need to be "Ce"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susanbardaweel

why ( ils sont des hommes ) is wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jane332232

I wrote Ils sont des hommes. This agrees with Liberumvitae's comment below. Maybe you should except both answers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatchew

Why is "ce sont des gens" not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Because that would mean "They are people", not "They are men".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mendes_army

Hey! Could someone please explain to me, when we have to use "Ce" and "ils". I keep making this mistake, and could really use some help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorDarb2

why isn't it "Ce sont les hommes." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

That would be "They are the men".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomOs658503

I don't understand why i always need to put du and des in Front Of words, the sentence makes perfect sense without them i get the des is for the plural but du? To me that means some of whatever it is, I'm only learning but a simple explanation would be nice. Also regardless of whether it's correct to include the du des before all these words is it something French people will actually say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"du" is the masculine singular partitive article. It means an undefined quantity of a mass thing, sometimes stated as "some" in English. For example "Il mange du fromage" means "He is eating cheese" or "He is eating some cheese".

"des" is the required plural indefinite article. If you put the sentence in singular, then if it has "un/une" in French or "a/an" in English, it will need "des" in plural. It means "an unknown quantity greater than one", also sometimes expressed with "some" in English. For example, if you take "She has strawberries" and put it in singular, it becomes "She has a strawberry" (Elle a une fraise). That tells you that you need "des" in plural, so "She has (some) strawberries" translates to "Elle a des fraises".

Also regardless of whether it's correct to include the du des before all these words is it something French people will actually say?

Yes, French people use "du", "de la", "des", etc. They grow up with it so it's a good deal easier for them than it is for us!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shalom345092

I got this wrong, and I am still confused on when to use C'est or Ce. May someone help me please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polyplot

Why is it "Ce sont" and not "Ces sont"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"ce" is invariable as a pronoun ("c'est" is merely the mandatory contraction of "ce est"). "ces" is an adjective meaning "these" or "those" - "ces hommes" would mean "these/those men".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValentinSe14370

If "ce" means they, what then does it mean "ils"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Usually, "they" is "elles" (exclusively feminine) or "ils" (exclusively masculine or mixed). However, "il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neslhanrose

i have to use "des"? please answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Yes. "des" is the required plural indefinite article for which there is no English equivalent. Try putting the sentence in singular. If it needs "un/une" in French and "a/an" in English, it will need "des" in plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

"They are men" is not really the same as "They are some men" so why is "des" required in this sentence? I KEEP getting tripped up on that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"des" is the required plural indefinite article. Try putting the sentence in singular. If it needs "une/un" in French and "a/an" in English, it will need "des" in plural.

There isn't really an English equivalent to "des", but sometimes the meaning of "more than one" is expressed with "some", so we usually accept answers both with and without "some" in the English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/priyamvada805057

why it cant be ils sont hommes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"des" is the plural indefinite article for which there is no English equivalent, and it is required, so it has to be "des hommes". Then, "il/elle est" and "ils/elles sont" change to "c'est" and "ce sont" before a modified noun, that is, a noun preceded by a modifier. A modifier can be:

  • an article: un, une, des, le, la, l', les
  • a number: un, deux...
  • a possessive adjective: mon, ton, son, ma, ta, sa, notre, votre, leur, mes, tes, ses, nos, vos, leurs
  • a demonstrative adjective: ce, cet, cette, ces

"il/elle est" + adjective stays "il/elle est" + adjective.

These articles go into more detail and are worth a read.
http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est

Also, the Tips and Notes for the Gallicism skill (click the lightbulb icon when you open the skill) give more information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suzyburch

Could I have used "Ils ont ?

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