"Widzisz człowieka idącego do parku?"

Translation:Do you see the man who is going to the park?

October 13, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelFivez

I guess something like " Widzisz człowieka idąc do parku?" would mean: "do you see a man while going to the park?"

Is there a good website/source that explains these imięsłów, I'm having trouble to find any by just googling

October 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

This one actually seemed very natural to me and I would say the same in English:

Do you see the person going to the park?

October 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

This sentence can both mean :

Widzisz człowieka idąc do parku (Do you see the man when you walk to the park)

Widzisz człowieka idącego do parku (Do you see the man who is walking to the park)

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Ah, that must be what Miĥal was referring to, I was thinking of something unrelated (logical issues). Do you see the person going to the park? means the second one. If it said, Do you see the person while going to the park? it would mean the first one. I guess the former might mean the latter but it would have be clear contextually but it still seems unnatural to me.

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

And you would do a dangling participle mistake ;)

October 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

My sentence is not incorrect.

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

I didn't say this. It is ambigous. Look at the first link above ;)

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/b_jamil

Firstly, thanks for the links you gave us, and engaging in an interesting discussion. As far as ambiguity is concerned you are right and Randall is wrong. But I find your assumption of probability is false, and see no way that logic can replace how a language is actually used. Randall's choice was also my first choice, as a native speaker from London. Easily! In other words, just because a sentence is ambiguous doesn't mean that both meanings have a 50-50 likelihood of being the primary one to be understood. In a related sense I also very much share Randall's feelings about elitism in language. Just saying.

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

It isn't ambiguous. It has a clear meaning. Logically most language is ambiguous or even contradictory, but language and people aren't really logical, so it isn't surprising. For example, "Nie chcę nic" would logically mean that I want something, but actually means I don't want anything. For some reason, some people take an absurd prescriptivist approach to all English, as if there is only one correct form of English. They claim the vast majority of people use the language wrong and that only their small, elite group is correct. To me, that is not only wrong, but it is elitist and offensive. It reminds me of this great video, which anyone interested in linguistics would probably really enjoy.

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

It has two possible meanings and both are equally probable without any context.

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/.mote.

What about "going INto the park"?

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Well, this would be equivalent to "entering the park", and thus would need a different verb (well, participle): "Widzisz człowieka wchodzącego do parku?"

June 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

"you see the man going to the park" should work too

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Added.

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ziggy69

How do we know that człowieka is not a female? I thought the word meant human and that mężczyzna meant man.

April 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

True, "człowiek" generally is the species known as "human". But if used about one specific person, it means exactly the same as "man". If I heard this sentence, I wouldn't even think about a woman.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ziggy69

So what would be the equivalent of człowiek for a woman? Or is there no such word. Just curious.

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Well, although of course "kobieta jest człowiekiem" (a woman is a human), there isn't a second word that could be use to substitute it. Unless we're going in the direction of "pani", which is something between "woman" and "lady", but then of course there's "pan" on the male side.

April 12, 2019
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