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  5. "Τι είναι το πυρίτιο;"

"Τι είναι το πυρίτιο;"

Translation:What is silicon?

October 14, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

The definite article is really unacceptable here. " What is silicon?" " The silicon you bought is not suitable".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 271

Yes, here I've removed "the" from the English. thanks you. I've also added "σιλικόνη" which is more common in Greek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drvno

«Σιλικόνη» translates to ‘silicone’ – a polymer that contains repeating chains of alternating silicon and oxygen atoms, so it is in fact not a synonym of «πυρίτιο», or ‘silicon’ in English. Both are commonly mistaken in all languages I know enough to see it.

For instance, Silicon Valley (Σίλικον Βάλλεϋ) ~ «Κοιλάδα του πυριτίου», not «Κοιλάδα της σιλικόνης».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Araucoforever

drvno, thank you for your contribution


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon345104

What is the silicon was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 271

Yes, that's because it should be: "What is silicon?" when referring to a general idea and silicon is uncountable. See mizinamo's comment this page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes; we don't use the definite article in this sort of situation in English.

"What is silicon? Silicon is a metal that ..." rather than "What is the silicon? The silicon is a metal that ...".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sigi_sk

In the fact, Silicon is not metal, it is metalloid (or half-metal in other languages).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Araucoforever

Do Greeks use an intonation to pose questions?? I do not hear an intonation from the bot in the recording of this question in Greek?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 271

Yes, you there should be an intonation to show a question but this recent audio update does not do it well. A new audio system is being tested and promises to be much better. Sorry, for the troubles.

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