https://www.duolingo.com/soniawaite

Et? Can anyone shed some light please?

I met a Danish woman recently and took advantage of it! However, she sounded nothing like anything on duolingo. i could find nothing on the radio or internet either that sounded like it. Her speech was a lot smoother. For instance 'mandenes' was pronounced without the stop at the 'd' and most striking of all, the words with 'et' on the end had the 't' pronounced. When I asked how to pronounce 'hjornet' (it's not clear on the app) she said (English phonetic spelling here) yawnit with no stop on the 'n' and a definite t sound at the end. I asked about this, and she screwed her face up and said 'I don't know why they do that.' Also when she said 'Jeg har taget det af' she pronounced a very definite 'eff'

So I am puzzled. Has she got a regional accent only heard in some little country place and no where else? Or is she very posh? How would the Queen say it?

2 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/arielkangaroo
arielkangaroo
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People in real life speak faster and with less distinction on each word. If you're referring to this clip of hjørnet, yes, it is generally said without that stop.

From your description, her Danish sounds normal. Are you sure she said "eff" though (to me this sounds like the letter F) or was it closer to a mixture "a/æ"? It's possible she has dialect, but I don't think anyone can tell you that without knowing where is from or hearing her speak.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soniawaite

thank you for that information. however, I am still puzzled. She most definitely pronounced the 'af' as 'eff' (like the letter) but what really confuses me was her insistence that words with the endings 'et' are pronounced as 'et' with the 't' sound at the end, not an 'l' or soft d sound. I can't find anything on line and that's why I wondered if it was regional or if it is more widely used to sound the 't' as a 't'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Logantj13

The ending is pronounced either as soft d or a "t" depending on where you live in Denmark. They're both correct. As a general rule those from Jylland(Jutland) pronounce it with a "t" and those from the Fyn(Fun) and Sjælland(Zealand) pronounce it with a soft d. It doesn't matter one bit how you say it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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Have you tried to compare it to any of the accents/dialects on this map here: http://dialekt.ku.dk/dialektkort

I know there are at least a few dialects that traditionally have no/a different soft d sound and no stød. Without knowing which area of Denmark she's from and struggling to locate Danish accents as it is, I can't be any more help than that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soniawaite

well, that was most illuminating! I didn't hear anything like, but it was very interesting to listen to them all, andalso very discouraging! I think I should maybe give up trying to learn Danish now. (but I won't)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fenjicka
fenjicka
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Af is pronounced "a" without an f, but some people like to say af with the f when they're reading out loud (I don't understand why they do that, but they do).. I've never heard hjørnet with a stop and I personally pronounce it with a soft d at the end when I'm speaking, though if someone asked me how it's pronounced I'd probably use a t sound at the end to be clear xD It could also be dialect that she's pronouncing it like t

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaO95

Do you know where in Denmark she is from? Because there IS a accent difference.

1 year ago
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