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  5. "Το κορίτσι έχει αγαπήσει το …

"Το κορίτσι έχει αγαπήσει το αγόρι."

Translation:The girl has loved the boy.

October 16, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

So, would this only be used where English uses the present perfect, or would it also be used for the simple past "the girl loved the boy"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 262

Yes, I think simple past fits very well here. Just as in English there are times when only the pres. perf. will do: "Do your homework." "I have done my homework, mom." :-) But otherwise, it's a matter of emphasis etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Thanks, I just wanted to make sure this wasn't a new, very specific innovation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreWinde1

Fell in love is wrong? K..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

Fell in love would be ερωτεύτηκε :)Plus, loving and falling in love are not exactly synonymous, no? ^.^

(Even if there was a slight chance for it to be correct, it would have to be has fallen in love)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCarver

this seems to imply that she no longer loves him - sad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 262

That would be past perfect "had loved" which shows a completed past action. Here we have present perfect shown an action which happened in the past at an unspecified time and may continue until now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCarver

Not sure that I agree with your analysis of English grammar - for example, "I have read the book" clearly does not imply that I am continuing to read it; use of the past perfect in English usually means that the action began in the past, is now over, and that the result is now present. The real problem with the Duo example is that "love" is not normally an action which takes place with a present result - "made love to" or "fallen in love with" would be better examples. I don't know if the original Greek sentence is normal in Greek. But thanks for your comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 262

"I have read the book". It is the fact that the book was read which remains a fact. That's what is meant by continues. We are not referring to reading the book but that the book was read.

Ok, let's see if I remember the 5 main uses of Present Perfect. The present perfect is to show something that happened in the past but the emphasis is not on the time.

So, first, it's at a non-specific time (He's read that book.), But "He read the book last December." Past tense.

second, it could be for something that started in the past and continues to the present, (I have lived here since I was a child.)

third, for repeated past actions, "How many times have you been to Chicago?)

fourth, an experience that continues to the present, "I have never forgotten the eclipse."

fifth, an action that impacts on the present. "OMG, have you paid the electric bill, we have no light." "I'm not buying that book because I've already read it." Like your example above.

The Greek without content is not great I agree. If it were, "the girl has loved him since she was a child." it would work out much better. We are working on a new tree and trying to pull in all these lopsided sentences.

Your comments are appreciated because they not only show the weak spots but they remind us to do better. We thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonidTere2

not a native English speaker, but) I've read, I've done, I've loved, I've thought comparing to I've been reading, doing, loving, thinking gives a difference in meaning, the first part of comparison has a meaning of finished action (the result), the second part - the actions that have started in the past and still go on. Isn't it so?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 262

Yes, you have understood that correctly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonidTere2

So, it is indeed a sad story, she has loved him, but now... Thank you Jaye16 for your answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 262

Yes, so, so sad. You found the right way to answer when there doesn't seem to be any "REPLY" space.

And of course, you're welcome we try our best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

It seems identical to Spanish La niña ha querido al niño. Peter Mackridge (The Modern Gk Language [Cambridge, 1985] 116-118) says that the action in this form of the perfect "must have some consequence in the present" even in instances in which the person was born long ago (έχω γεννήθει το ΧΧΧΧ) or the person has long since been dead (έχει γράψει δέκα μυθιστορήματα). In this case, as people have noted here, we can imagine the consequences, e.g., a broken heart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

or the person has long since been dead (έχει γράψει δέκα μυθιστορήματα)

This sounds really unnecessary, in my opinion.

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