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  5. "Ποιος βρέχεται;"

"Ποιος βρέχεται;"

Translation:Who gets wet?

October 16, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Shouldn't the translation be: "Who is getting wet"? Doesn't that seem more appropriate for present passive tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 300

Since Greek doesn't distinguish between "gets wet" and "is getting wet" both are correct and accepted as correct translations. If you used "Who is getting wet." and it was rejected please let us know. What kind of exercise was it? E.g. Strengthen skill, etc. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaKoutis

Is "who is being rained on?" also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 300

We don't really know why someone is getting wet here. Of course, rain is the most logical but we can't add it without context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaKoutis

Thanks. It's a new word for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinScott18

I'm curious: Βρέχει means it's raining, but the verb βρέχω literally means to douse or pour, so βρέχει is equivalent to the English term "it's pouring", which actually means very heavy rain. Is there a verb in greek formed from the noun for rain (βροχή) to describe raining in general? Or maybe it's only because we get so much of the wet stuff in the UK that we bother to make the distinction!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

"Βροχή" is the generic term.

"Καταιγίδα"=thunderstorm/rainstorm

"Νεροποντή"=downpour


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderG637207

how would it be in Greek "who is wet"? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

how would it be in Greek "who is wet"?

Ποιος είναι βρεγμένος;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vladimirchan

Is there another word for getting wet from spilling milk or getting wet at the beach? Is βρεχετει exclusively for rain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

It's the same, but it's highly more likely that this will happen with water. For other liquids, I'd say it's ok to use "λερώνομαι" (=to get dirty) as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark241672

Could this also be what gets wet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Could this also be what gets wet?

No.

ποιος = who

τι = what


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MomKat5

What about translating it as "which" gets wet? / "which" is getting wet? That was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vemund75118

I think I remember that βρεχει means "it rains". Βρεχεται then should mean "it is raining". What is the greek adjective/adverb meaning just "wet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I think I remember that βρεχει means "it rains".

That's the most common meaning, yes.

Βρεχεται then should mean "it is raining".

Eh? That doesn't follow at all.

βρέχεται is passive in form, so it would mean "it is being rained".

Which makes no sense, of course, since "rain" can't usually take a direct object and so can't be turned into a passive voice.

βρέχει can also mean "make wet", and from that we can get βρέχεται "is being made wet = gets wet" and the participle βρεγμένος "which was made wet = wet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vemund75118

Well. I have never spoken or heard the greek language. In the other verbs in this lesson the εται ending forms the verb into what we in Norway call presens partisipp. So, I thought I saw a line. The translation " it is being rained" is no good. In norwegian the translation of βρειχεi would be "det regner" and the translation of βρεχεται would be "det er regnende", which makes sense but is never used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The translation " it is being rained" is no good.

Of course. I said as much.

So you can't use the meaning "rain" of βρέχει to interpret βρέχεται.

In norwegian the translation of βρειχεi would be "det regner"

That is a translation of βρέχει but not the (only) translation.

the translation of βρεχεται would be "det er regnende"

No. It would be det er regnet or something like that.

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