https://www.duolingo.com/Zkamin

Stress in Russian words

Zkamin
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

this may have been answered already but how do I know where the stress is when I'm declining nouns? Or is there no rule? воДА so I pronounce it more like vuhda, but ВОду in accusative so it retains the o as in vodu. if I have to learn where the stress is for every case form out there for just one word, I am going to die.

2 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DuoFaber
DuoFaber
  • 18
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 955

http://masterrussian.com/blog/stressed-about-word-stress-in-russian-language/

You don't need to go through a dictionary and memorize every single word, you just need to listen a lot, and eventually it will come naturally. That's also how you learned every single word in your native language, inclùding how to prònounce them. Sorry, did I say prònounce? I meant pronòunce.

Good luck!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
Mod
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7

You have to learn the stress in every form.

However, these stresses are subject to some stable patterns. Most frequent patterns are not that many. For example, жена ("wife") is ending-stressed in all its singular forms and stem-stressed in all its plural forms. Сестра is similar, too, but its Genitive plural is сестёр, so it has that Ё stressed in the Genitive and Accusative plural.Стол ("table, desk") is ending-stressed in all its forms (except the dictionary form that has a zero ending).

Full forms of adjectives never shift stress.

Non-past forms of verbs generally either have a static stress or have their ending stressed in the 1st person singular but the stem stressed in all other forms

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zkamin
Zkamin
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Okay. If there is a similar pattern, then I am a little more relieved - kind of like vowel reduction changes in certain cases in Polish. but until then, I will have to look up a word Everytime and get the feeling of where the stress is. thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zkamin
Zkamin
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

You said the stress is on the end in all forms for стол but the Wiktionary says стола́ми? Also река in accusative singular form is ре́ку, although реку́ is more obsolete form of it??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
Mod
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7

Oh. Good catch. I didn't think about all the forms. It is indeed ре́ку

As to forms like столами or любите — some endings have more than one syllable themselves.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zkamin
Zkamin
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Спасибо. I will not be scared of accents anymore. I think if I learn and look up words much more, I think this accent thing is not even an issue. I am just complaining like a baby like many beginners at a new language. Most languages I learned have fixed accent- penultimate stress for Spanish and Polish and first syllable stress for Hungarian. But it's interesting again to note English also since IT ALSO DOES NOT HAVE A FIXED ACCENT yet I speak it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zkamin
Zkamin
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Vietnamese Chinése Japanése I can't believe I do this unconsciously

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sllewell2
sllewell2
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 20
  • 19
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 1411

My Russian professor explained it as vowel reduction. The O under stress sounds like "the Brooklyn drawl" (like "OHwa")--a lot like a-fada in some dialects of Irish--whereas unstressed it sounds more like "AH" (or the English "short-o") or even further reduced to a an "uh" sound as you have it.

So, "vahDA," but "VOHDka."

I actually didn't find it very hard. Then again, my Russian is VERY rusty and I'm really thrown by the Russian keyboard because the letters don't line up with anything like their English counterparts, but "Life is Suffering."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 20
  • 15
  • 1835

If you want to check the stress for any particular word, type the form in here. Note that "ё" is not used--use "е."

2 years ago
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.