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  5. "We drink strawberry juice."

"We drink strawberry juice."

Translation:Nós bebemos suco de morango.

February 9, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rdpioneer

should allow the more common.. "a gente bebe suco de morango"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

That is often spoken, but it's colloquial


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celpek

It is informal conversation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e.cambourn

Why do you say suco de morango, why not suco do morango. Suco ends with an o, so does morango. Why is de used in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celpek

De morango= general, all the strawberries Do morango= specific, the strawberry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterHaupt1

"do" is a contraction of "de o" - you use "do" only when you need "de" and the article "o". (When this happens isn't always clear to me). The preposition "de" doesn't change with gender.

(AFAIK, I am just learning, too...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1894

I put them both in Google. "Suco do morango" got 7990 hits (including e.cambourn's). "Suco de morango" got 809000 hits.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

"Do" = de + o = of the

If you have only one strawberry and do a juice "of the strawberry", you can say "suco do morango"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertoTom7

note that in english the two have very distinct meanings.. although technically both are probably correct.

  • Strawberry juice = suco/sumo de morango
  • Juice of the Strawberry = suco/sumo do morango

While you're not so often going to run into this with strawberries specifically, there are some products with a history and local context while are "juice of the something" rather than just plain old "something juice".

Specifically to a specific type of fruit, "juice of the pomegranate" is an example I ran into in google. I was used to make wine. Similarly "juice of the barley" is an irish song about beer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/g07h4xf00

"suco do morango" translates into "the juice belonging to the strawberry" like the strawberry owns the juice or something, rather than "juice of strawberry"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drnoir

Suco de frango?! Chicken juice... Ugh!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsaFaith

Well in the case of "suco de frango", you could think of it as chicken broth...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Granny_Patti

This works too: Nós tomamos suco de morango.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ratjar

Why can't it be "suco de morangos" ? I mean, isn't there more than one strawberry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scottjduff

Strawberries juice would be wrong in English too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1894

Add a cup of the juice of strawberries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodriados

As you may see, strawberry is being used like an adjective in English. And so this is how it's done in Portuguese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

There's no problem, but it is unusual


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathildeCadrot

why couldn't we say UM suco de morango?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodriados

Simply because "juice" is uncountable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

But if you could, like asking in a restaurant: I want a strawberry juice/eu quero um suco... [a glass of juice]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanWexler

Why dont they accept Sumo? Since Sumo is the word in Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

Most of the time it is accepted. It is the normal word for juice in Portugal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TikKan1

Why 'sumo de morango' is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

It should be, since it is used in Portugal.

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