"I am afraid to go."

Translation:J'ai peur d'y aller.

6 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bdoing
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"Aller" needs to have a destination in French, so if there isn't a specific one, you have to add an "y". You can't just go, you have to go to a non-specific "there".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alathat
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Grumble. If you say so. How about "J'ai peur de sortir"? Est-ce le même problème? Doit-il être aussi "d'y sortir"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheM11Mum
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Sortir is 'to go out' so it already has it's destination. Also, I have a vague recollection that the 'y' also makes reference to somewhere that has already been mentioned. "Je vais à la fête. Je ne veux pas y aller." I could be wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chiquita62
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So sorry, but since this is a forum about being language sticklers..."its" needs no apostrophe in your sentence. But here's a lingot for the great answer!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheM11Mum
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oops, sorry about the errant apostrophe, don't know what came over me, I really do know better! Honest...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReemAlAli

Merci beaucoup, i finally got it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcounts
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Merci. Good simple explanation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crbratu
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What about "J'ai peur de m'en aller"? Is this acceptable?

In fact the english phrase should also have a destination I think (afraid to go there, afraid to go from here...) unless you consider it as "leave" = "partir"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheM11Mum
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I don't think the English does require a destination. "Have you made that doctor's appointment yet?" "I'm afraid to go"...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pursernick

Where is the "there"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheM11Mum
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'y', when literally translated the sentence reads...'I have fear of there to go' (or something like that)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/r.o.c.

can 'j'ai peur de partir' be used?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/super_moi
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Would not be entirely wrong, but better to learn go = aller and leave = partir.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickDaniel1

I hate these gotcha problems, why can't duo try to teach me a concept before expecting me to understand these kinds of nuances?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen545189

Lots of things we learn intuitively without bringing in the analytic part of the brain. Memorizing the rule sometimes just muddles things up. It's better to see if the brain just acts by the rule and if there is confusion, then you examine the rule. At least that is the way I think about it. Children learn their first language that way.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

Sorry, I'm very forgetful regarding the reason for d'y aller... "to go there"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darjeelingsavage
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I think it's to do with the phonetics of it. de+a can't happen without adding a sound, so it has to be d'y aller. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ketan1987
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What is the 'd' supposed to represent here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheM11Mum
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"Avoir peur de" is to have a fear of, thus d' is the 'of' before a vowel, so shortened to 'd' apostrophe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnvGOxSJ

Then why isn't the English sentence, "I am afraid to go there."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georgeoftruth
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As explained in the first post above. French needs that destination. "J'ai peur d'y aller" can be both "I'm afraid to go" and "I'm afraid to go there". Presenting the learner with "I'm afraid to go there" will deprive them of the basic grammar rule about "aller".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wineguy14

How would you say "i'm afraid to go there"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georgeoftruth
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Same as above. "J'ai peur d'y aller".

1 month ago
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