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  5. "Azok a gyönyörű képek is lee…

"Azok a gyönyörű képek is leesnek a falról."

Translation:Those gorgeous pictures are falling off the wall, too.

October 18, 2016

11 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bastette54

"Gyönyörű" means nice? I thought it meant "gorgeous" or something like that.

October 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Yeah, 'nice' is a bit of an understatement. :I


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eve22217

And gyönyörű indeed means gorgeous, wonderful or beautiful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guirita123

'Also' is not accepted as a translation for 'is'. Hmm. . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eve22217

For 'is' you could also say 'even' and then start the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zsuzsi97194

I don't think "even" would be as god as "also" here. But they want to use the simpler "too" right here, I am starting to write the way they expect even if it's not "gyönyörű!" As I recall, a pearl is a "gyöngy" or something like that, so it has that root for something jewelry-like, am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Pearl" is gyöngy, yes. It might be related with gyönyörű, but that relation is disputed. Clear etymology is hard to find in a language as isolated as Hungarian, but here is what the Magyar etimológiai szótár says about it: One theory is that it developed from gyöngy to a transitional form gyöngyörű similar to how domb (hill) got expanded to domború (convex). But that transitional form is a very young one (about 200 years old only), so a sound shift to gyönyörű isn't very likely, and there was never a root gyön- found that developed from gyöngy which could have explained that sound shift.

But in any case, it's a nice mnemonic. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zsuzsi97194

Thank you for that link. It will be useful.

In my limited study of linguistics in college I learned I how fluid languages are and how loanwords become adopted in daily use.

Magyar is a great example of this with the number of Turk words that were imported over approximately 400 years of domination. In the 20th century with increased industrialization many English words have been adapted to add to a lexicon that had no words for new concepts.

I know many Hungarians who speak an Anglicized version of the language that is very similar to Spanglish in many areas of the U.S. where there are a lot of people with one foot in Spanish and one in English. My daughter-in-law is one of these and she is not really totally fluent in either language at an advanced level although she is a college graduate. Her speech and writing is accepted almost as a dialect in places like Miami.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bastette54

What is Anglicized Hungarian like? And where do the people who speak it live? The UK, maybe?

My understanding of "Spanglish" is that people who speak it are fluent in both languages, but tend to go back and forth between them, when speaking to others who are also fluent in both languages. Your example of people who aren't fluent in either language speaking some combination of both makes me wonder whether that could be called a creole.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bastette54

Hmm, is 200 years such a short time for a sound shift? I've heard sound shifts happen within my own lifetime, many of them. In the example of gyönyörű, only one sound ("gy") is dropped. Though I guess within 200 years, there would still be a lot of people saying "gyöngyörű." I'm probably not the right person to ask about that. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Oh? Which sound shifts have you noticed? Usually they take a while, and they're ever harder to do with the degree of literacy and communication we have nowadays.

It's not impossible to have a sound shift in 200 years, of course. ngy to ny is a rather subtle one, and Hungary is not a big country, so those can happen faster, but it's still not a lot of time. Especially in the most recent 200 years, with industrialisation and improvement in literacy, especially as gyöngyörű seemed to be pretty rarely used overall and is not to be found as its own entry in modern dictionaries at all.

My own theory about that is that it indeed developed from gyöngyörű, but that form was misread/misheard early on, so only the shortened gyönyörű took proper hold in the language.

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