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  5. "Ich trinke dein Wasser."

"Ich trinke dein Wasser."

Translation:I am drinking your water.

October 18, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sadam983772

Ich trinke deinen Milchshake!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CleoMcLutz

I am having a hard time using dein, deine and deinen. Does it have to do with the gender of the subject?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Not the subject, but with the gender, number, and case of the thing which is owned. (The owner is du, i.e. "you" when speaking to one person whom you know well or to one child.)

Here, Wasser is neuter, singular, accusative so the form is dein (no ending).

There's an inflection table here: http://www.canoo.net/inflection/dein:Pron:Poss:2nd:SG (see the table "attributiv (vor einem Nomen)" for this case since it's in front of a noun, Wasser).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarahheathh

how do you know when trinke means I'm drinking versus when it means I drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

how do you know when trinke means I'm drinking versus when it means I drink?

Context.

Without context, both translations will most often make sense.

If there's a time expression such as "right now" or "every day", then that can determine which tense to use in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anno35

"i drink your water", should be acceptable. it is a perfectly good sentence in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"i drink your water", should be acceptable

It is. That's one of the accepted answers.

it is a perfectly good sentence in English.

That's a necessary but not sufficient condition, so it's mostly irrelevant here. Sentences not only have to be "perfectly good English" but also have to mean the same thing as the original. (Yours does, but sometimes people propose translations that are perfectly good English but have a different meaning.)

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