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https://www.duolingo.com/HeatherCroker

Immersion - persistence does not always pay

Grappling with texts which have been left by others because they are difficult does not always pay, as such texts are proof read less frequently than new texts, e.g. the text on Robert Burns.

4 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/hburdon

It doesn't pay, if what you're after is quickly progressing through the tiers. But grappling with difficult texts is its own reward, isn't it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeatherCroker

You are right, knowing you have not taken the easy option has its own rewards. Yet I still felt disappointed when after for me challenging work, there was no response to the work I had done. Thank you for your comment.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatTancock
KatTancock
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For this reason I tend to mix things up - do some new sentences that get me better points and let me practise speed, and also spend some time on harder stuff.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I like to tackle the hard stuff - I learn more - sometimes find myself doing a little research on the subject to be sure I understand it in English. Don't really care if I progress through the tiers, as I am more self competitive than competitive with others, although it does help to have someone looking at my translations and correcting real errors or doing proofreading.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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Well, I got all interested when you said Robbie Burns, but then I realized that it's a Robbie Burns Wikipedia article in German, which means that it's almost certainly a translation from the English Wikipedia article, which means that it's bound to be disappointing, because it will either be the the same as or worse than the English Wikipedia article. Why do people even bother to upload these?

Try Mahler. Or Hoffman. Or (bwahahahahah) Kafka.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeatherCroker

You are right some of the German was a bit dodgy. Next time I will be more selective in what I choose to translate, but having started I thought it cowardly to just move on. I was impressed by how advanced you are in two languages

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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I'm sorry, I didn't realize this was your first edit. The articles I recommended are on the tough side...

This might be a better starter article, on puffins, being actively worked on by first-level translators, with no edit wars going on: https://www.duolingo.com/translation/df3b1c44c62d732427d9db83c1a7d712

Here's my strategy for when I'm feeling neglected: when I translate, I look for people at or just above my translation level whose edits I like, and I follow them. Then later I check my activity stream to see if they're working on anything that interests me, and if they are, I go work on that. That way, you wind up working together, learning from other people, and checking each other's edits.

Have a look at these guides if you haven't already: Immersion community guidelines: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/984423
Navigation in Immersion: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1276245

Beware articles where the first two sentences have 83 versions....

Good luck!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hburdon

Great tips, they should be added to the Guidelines!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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BTW I'm a little startled by where I am in two languages too...

4 years ago