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  5. "Το δερμάτινο γάντι."

"Το δερμάτινο γάντι."

Translation:The leather glove.

October 24, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kristoff-Johan

δέρμα = leather = skin ... like dermatologist!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's even closer if you remember that the stem of δέρμα is δέρματ- -- for example, the genitive is δέρματος. (But words can't end in -τ in Ancient Greek so the nominative became simply δέρμα.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wchargin

In modern Greek, as well, I believe that words can only end in vowels or the letters ν and ς. Loan words are exceptions, and you can note that these do sound odd (ρέκορ, γκρουπ, πόκερ); here is a list of the exceptions that I found.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Ancient Greek also allowed -ρ (ο ρήτωρ, for example, or το φρέαρ, το στέαρ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sauloprgr

I thought the same. I'm a native spanish speaker and i just made the relation after a few exercises. Derma as in "Dermatologo" which is most probably the same in Greek


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, at least in the accusative case. The nominative has the typical masculine nominative ending -s, ο δερματολόγος o dermatologos.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuicyyCandy

What's the difference between using 'δερμάτινη' and 'δερμάτινο' in a sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

δερμάτινη is the feminine singular form of the adjective, used before feminine singular nouns, and δερμάτινο is the neuter singular form of the adjective, used before neuter singular nouns. (Or the masculine accusative singular form used before a masculine singular noun in the accusative case.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMEND1

Are you saying that some adjectives have genders like in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wchargin

Adjectives themselves do not have genders, but they do decline, agreeing with the nouns that they modify. (Like in French and Spanish.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I'm saying that almost all adjectives have different endings depending on the gender of the noun that they describe -- like in French!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

Like in let's say almost any language except English! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

I'm pretty sure γάντι is related to Italian "guanto" and Spanish "guante".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dowda0101

Also French "gant"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

So one cannot literally spell out a Greek word to English...γ=g ά=a ν=n τ=t ι=i


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wchargin

It's not clear what you're asking. Are you noting that "ντ" is pronounced as "(n)d"? or that γ/ν look similar to some Roman letters?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Just comparing both English and Greek on keyboard. For example, "πουκάμισο". π=p; μ=m; σ=s, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wchargin

Ah, got it. Yes: the Greek keyboard maps phonetically to the U.S. English keyboard quite well where possible. The exceptions, like "c/ψ" and "v/ω", usually occur when there is no corresponding letter (no Greek "c", no English "ω"). You'll often find that you can indeed spell spell out the word, as in γάντι, σκύλος, πουκάμισο, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrigo188394

Why not plural for glove, we have two hands!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But here you just found one and are talking about it :)

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