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  5. "Trotzdem ist er weg gegangen…

"Trotzdem ist er weg gegangen."

Translation:Nevertheless, he has gone away.

February 10, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burento

Could "weg gegangen" be written as one word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bf2010
  • 2326

According to Duden 2013 it should be one word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Correct, though you'll often see it misspelled as two words. Please report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

The big picture is that "weg" is a separable prefix in other tenses/contexts....."Er geht weg..", while apparently not in this tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

The term ‘trennbare Verben’=“separable verbs” is a bit misleading. In the infinitive and participial forms (e.g. ‘weggehen’=“to go away”, ‘weggehend’=“going away”, ‘weggegangen’=“gone away”), separable verbs are never separated; in all other forms, they are always separated.

When a separable verb is separated, the parts aren't merely separated into two words; what was the prefix becomes a particle that always comes after the main part of the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesworks75503

Why is "Anyway, he has gone away" marked wrong by DL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bradyoder

I think this "weg" should be with a short e sound, unlike "der Weg."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Correct. It's consistently mispronounced throughout Duolingo's German sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Yes, the dict.cc audio recordings have it that way too -- the noun with the long e, the adjective and adverb with a very short e and quite a hard g.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibor.havlik

weggehen ist one word - hence weggegangen should be written together


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tale154809

Why not, "anyway, he has gone away"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivouken

"He is gone anyway" is also one way to say this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyamkumarR

Can anyone split explain the word "Trotzdem"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bradyoder

"Trotz" is the preposition "despite" (it takes a genitive object, e.g. "trotz des Wetters"="despite the weather", though it's now frequently used with a dative object, "trotz dem Wetter".) "Trotzdem" means "despite this/that".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyamkumarR

Thank you, that helped a lot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hloch

what is wrong with still he went away? How would you say that differently in german? thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

“Still, he went away.” would be ‘Dennoch ging er weg.’


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajapplegateiv

"He already left" is not an acceptable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bradyoder

That would be "Er ist schon weggegangen." Trotzdem=in spite of (it/something)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abdelrahma221818

is weg similar to (passed away) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuyPierreP

what about for the English translation: "He's gone anyway". That's what I would say in a similar situation.

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