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"A mãe tem colocado a filha para dormir cedo."

Translation:The mother has been putting her daughter to bed early.

February 10, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lesliewilman

"Put to sleep" is a common euphemism for "euthanize". I have always put my children and grandchildren "to bed", but not always early. I agree with Lingodingle that children are like body parts and, for that matter, bedrooms. The definite article stands in for a possessive adjective appropriate to the subject of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anomalocaris

I sent a report about this about a week ago. The Oxford Dictionary states pretty clearly that "put to sleep" can only mean "euthanize" or "anesthetize" http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/sleep?q=put+to+sleep#sleep__27 Glad I'm not the only one who finds this annoying!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Fortunately, Portuguese is not euthanize :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrchidBlack

"Putting to sleep" is always used for pets, and refers to being merciful to an animal who is in a great deal of pain from an accident, a terminal illness, or complications of old age.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgorHenriqueA

It can be, not the most common interpretation but a possible one nonetheless, it may have entered the language by American influence recently, but still, it is a possible interpretation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melodynava

I'm a native speaker and use "put to sleep" and "put to bed" interchangeably. Never looked up the definition but I've heard others use it as well. From Texas btw


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

From New England. I believe that we use "put to bed" much more frequently than "put to sleep" in the context of "getting the kids into bed". I associate "to put to sleep" with (1) euthananizing a pet or (2) in the expression: That book/lecture is so boring that it will put you to sleep.


[deactivated user]

    In UK English, put to sleep is what you do to very old and sick dogs and horses. That is you euthanise them.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reidlearnsguitar

    Isn't "the daughter" a more accurate translation than "her daughter"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

    Normally the best English uses "her".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

    reidlearnsguitar: "the daughter" could signify someone else's daughter (next-door neighbor). Whereas, "her daughter" is more definitive in whose daughter she belongs to.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanMinjares

    Why is it not "A mae tem colocado sua filha para dormir cedo?"

    Wouldn't that be the correct translation, because "sua filha" means your/his/her daughter?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

    It's ok, but unnecessary, because it's implicit without context...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CARLOS112393

    You are wong. The correct sentence most be: The mother has been putting her daughter ON BED TO SLEEP EARLY.

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