"Ce volant est impossible à tourner."

Translation:This steering wheel is impossible to turn.

February 10, 2013

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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The liaison is not where it should be: not between "volant" and "est" but between "est" and "impossible".

February 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhenor
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Why is this "impossible à" and not "impossible de" ?

October 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/adriensh
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I don't know if this can be a general rule but I would use "impossible de" when there is an object or another word after the verb following "impossible" : "Ce mot est impossible à prononcer" "Il est impossible de prononcer ce mot"

October 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/prashg
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You mean to say: " would use "impossible DE" when there is an object or another word after the verb following "impossible" : "Ce mot est impossible à prononcer" "Il est impossible de prononcer ce mot""

Correct? Not trying to be nitpicky, but your comment is very helpful, so I just want to ensure it's extra clear. Thanks in advance!

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/adriensh
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woops you're right :)

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanTheNeko

Using "à" and "de" to convict the "to" idea sometimes consists of the subject of the sentence and rarely, mostly in common phrases and idioms, the word that goes before it. In an actual sentence, the subject could either be a dummy or real subject.

A real subject is a real object or idea, for example:

Je (Subject is a real person) vais aller à l'école

Ça (Not an actual object as "it" does not have any corollating meaning) va être difficile de refuser

November 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/babatabita
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Why is "This steering wheel cannot be turned" wrong? Strikes me as better English than "... is impossible to turn".

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/tsuj1g1r1
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I agree. While the English sentence is logical this way, I feel it conveys a different meaning than the French sentence, since the French word "impossible" can express inability in addition to impossibility.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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As a native Anglophone, I'm quite comfortable with 'impossible' being an hyperbolic way of exressing 'difficult'. A parallel instance would be 'I'll never finish this work' when in fact, you know full well that you will finish it eventually.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/tsuj1g1r1
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You're right. It's just that using the computer in French, I frequently encounter messages to the effect of "Opération impossible à compléter", where English would use "Operation could not be completed" instead of "Operation was impossible to complete", the latter of which would imply that it would be pointless to try the operation again, something the French statement on disait que doesn't. :D

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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Yes, the different shades of meaning of the same words in French as opposed to English are often subtle and can easily be a source of confusion for students of the other language. 'Susceptible' springs to mind as a prime example.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/yab401
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I havn't tried it but will it be right to translate "... à tourner" to "to steer"?

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/tsuj1g1r1
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I tried; it wasn't.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kemar14
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wait a second I thought volant is flying and roue is wheel

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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Yes, 'en volant' is flying, but 'volant' is steering wheel. 'Roue' is wheel, as you say. There are words in English that have different, even opposite meanings. 'Cleave' is an excellent example, since it can mean two opposite things. If we cleave to something, we adhere closely to it, but if we cleave something we split it down the middle.

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Midnightwards666

I'd seen the word "tourner" before and I knew it meant "spin" in English, so I wrote that. Is it not an acceptable translation? It wasn't marked as right.

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Context is an important element of translation, i.e., one "turns" the steering wheel--one does not "spin" it.

August 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartFras5

Why "that"? "That" is usually used in English when you have multiple instances of an object in the same place and need to disambiguate them. Wouldn't it be far more likely be saying either "This" or "The"?

September 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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In this context, "ce" may be either "this" or "that", but never "the".

August 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin968039

Ça s'appelle un roller coaster dans un carnaval pas une voiture

October 28, 2018
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