"Mẹcủatôiviếtchotôimộttấmséc."

Translation:My mother writes me a check.

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Raymondo19

"My mother writes a cheque for me" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

That would be perceived to mean your mother writes on behalf of you while the sentence here means to give you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Since "cho" quite often appears to mean on its behalf, how would you say that she writes a cheque on my behalf?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

Mẹ của tôi viết một tấm séc giùm tôi

or

Mẹ của tôi viết giùm tôi một tấm séc

The word giùm means "on behalf of, to help, for" in the context of doing something so that the other person doesn't have to.

Although cho can be interpreted as meaning "on behalf of", it's better to use giùm to avoid the ambiguity.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.rM
Mr.rM
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Although that is an ambiguous English sentence, that's also correct depending on the context.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

Yes but what I wrote is how I and others here would perceive it to be immediately. The ambiguity is the point I was trying to point out. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
Dan553966
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No, in English we say "writes a check for me" with either meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

Keyword is "can". English has many dialects and here in Australia it is far more common to say:

"My mother wrote me a cheque" (to give to me)

"My mother wrote a cheque for me" (on behalf of me)

Slight grammatical differences across different English dialects, really.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
Dan553966
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The objection is to the word order of "writes for me a check," which was the approved answer on my smartphone version of DL. Not even Australians say that I'm sure. There is no problem with either "writes me a check" or "writes a check for me." Accentuation can make either formulation have either of the meanings under discussion, that is, stressing "me" or stressing "check" makes a difference in how the sentence might be understood. But, outside of Pensylvania Dutch, "writes for me a check" is just not on.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

I agree that accentuation can work to distinguish between different meanings but I disagree with "writes for me a check" not being used even if it is more archaic sounding.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
Dan553966
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Actually, I say "...writes me a check" if I am the payee and "...writes a check for me" in any other situation. I do not say, "...writes for me a check" in any case.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
Dan553966
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If there are native English speakers who say, "Writes for me a check" I haven't met any of them. At the very least, such an infrequent utterance should not be the preferred answer in a translation exercise.

1 year ago
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