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https://www.duolingo.com/Guitardude2000

Irish prepositions - Please Help

Guitardude2000
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I'm really struggling with Irish prepositions, any help or outline of rules and usage below would be extremely appreciated.

1 year ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ThDonaghey
ThDonaghey
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I had the same problem my first time or two through the Duolingo materials. You'll find some of what you need on the web page for the preposition (mobile apps hide all of that material, though). Don't panic - if you keep at it it'll start to make sense. I did find that repeatedly bashing my head against them eventually made an impression.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Would you give an example of the struggles that you’re experiencing? That would assist others in being able to offer relevant help.

You can find rules and usage at the Gramadach na Gaeilge site.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

You haven't said what you're finding difficult about prepositions, but I imagine that your problem is that you're not finding an exact one-to-one correspondence between prepositions in English and in Irish. But that's just the nature of propositions, and there's no reason why Irish should have developed the same patterns of prepositions as English did - after all, there's no obvious reason that we should "look at" someone, but "listen to" them - why do we use two different prepositions, and why would you assume than another language would make the same non-obvious choice of prepositions?

In most cases, translating the prepositions on their own is fairly straightforward, but when you combine them with a verb you need to translate the whole phrasal verb together, and not try to translate the preposition separately from the verb - that just doesn't work, because phrasal verbs are simply cultural habits that have built up over centuries, and they aren't necessarily logical - which is why "look after" and "hear about" aren't closely related in meaning to "look at" and "listen to".

That's the issue of "prepositions as vocabulary". The other issue with preposition in Irish is what, if any, initial mutations they require, and that's really just a matter of practice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingomaster111

Prepositions can be tricky. The endings are usually the same for the different subjects; "orm", "liom" and "agam" are all 1st person singular and all end in -m.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EndaAMT
EndaAMT
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Lingomaster111 is right the endings are similar for the different people. 1st person singular always ends in -m, 2nd sing. in -t, 3rd sing. changes, !st plural in -n, 2nd plural in -bh and 3rd plural changes but is usually -u

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Well, good luck. I am horrible at my Irish prepositions. I really can't ever remember them. I think the way they are presented is really confusing. My grammar book has a list of "simple prepositions" I am going to memorize those and I think that will help me to understand better. Pronouns are also a horror to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul5852
Paul5852
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I found this chart to be a very helpful reference.

http://gaeilgesanastrail.com/docs/prepositions.html

2 months ago