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https://www.duolingo.com/Lingomaster111

there are some mistakes on the Irish course

I translated "leim" as "to read" but it told me I was wrong

1 year ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Léim can mean either “I read” (present tense) or “jumped” (past tense) or “Jump!” (imperative mood); the correct translation can depend upon the context in which it’s found.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The verb léigh is the Irish for "read". "To read a book" is leabhar a léamh.

léim doesn't mean "to read", it means "I read (present tense)", though as a noun it is also the Irish for "a jump", and also occurs in various forms of the verb "jump".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ndhardy535

On a completely different subject would you say you are fluent in Gaeilge after all the time you've spent on duolingo learning it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

No, I wouldn't consider myself fluent. I can often follow written and spoken Irish reasonably well, filling in the bits that I miss from context, but with spoken Irish it is very much dependent on the speaker - some speakers are much easier to follow than others (dialect, speed, enunciation and vocabulary all come into play there), and my vocabulary still isn't strong enough for a lot of written content.

It's very clear to me how important context is when I'm listening to the news, and I can understand one topic reasonably well, and then I'm totally lost with the next topic, because I don't have the vocabulary to build the right context (there was a reference to oileán na Cipire today, and I was struggling to understand what the news about "the Sandwich Islands" was, until the last sentence referenced na Gréagaigh, and I realized that they had been talking about the "Island of Cyprus" all along.

What that really comes down to is that I'm still translating to and from English, and I can't do that fast enough to maintain much of a conversation beyond a fairly basic level. Listening to the radio and watching TG4 helps me to improve the speed that I can translate from Irish to English, but for greater fluency, I need to move to the next step beyond translation, and begin to actually "think" in Irish. For instance, I attended a lecture recently in which the presenter explained things in Irish first, and then again in English. A couple of times I remember saying to myself "but he already said that", only to realize that the I had heard him say it in Irish first, and I had just internalized the knowledge, without consciously translating it, or at least without being aware of doing so. But that doesn't happen often enough (yet - and there aren't may bilingual occasions where you can notice it happening).

I have no way of knowing how far along the path to fluency I am - I have managed to get a 5 in the Duolingo Progress test (though that was probably a good day with a fair wind), but I know that I have a lot more to learn outside Duolingo, and that I will become "more fluent" as I keep learning, but real fluency is still an distant target.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ndhardy535

That was beautiful

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Thank you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuchairF
LuchairF
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I realise this is off topic, but in the light of your excellent answer above, i want to ask if the No Bearla presenter Manchán Magan stopped you in the street during the making of the programme, would you have spoken to him in Irish? I am asking because i watched a couple of the episodes on YouTube and I am not sure what to make of it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

(I can't reply directly to your question).

I generally brush past anyone who is taking a survey or trying to engage passersby in the street. On the other hand, if I was standing at a bus stop, and someone asked me a question or made a comment about the weather, I'd generally respond. I don't think I'd act any differently whether the interaction was in English or Irish. My job doesn't involve working with the public, so I don't really know how I'd deal with those situations.

There's also the fact that, because I'm not used to speaking Irish on a frequent basis, it takes me a few minutes to "change gears". I've noticed on a couple of occasions when I've met with some other people to practice, that it takes a few minutes to warm up - even reading a text out loud, I stumble for the first few minutes until I get into my stride, but once I get going, I can read aloud reasonably well. So if someone stopped me cold in the street, while I was in the middle of thinking about whatever project I was working on, or what I will have for dinner when I get home, I would definitely hum and haw, and be slow about responding.

1 year ago