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  5. "La robe qu'elle veut est rou…

"La robe qu'elle veut est rouge."

Translation:The dress that she wants is red.

February 18, 2014

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sunmckenna78

Can someone explain the qu'elle part please? Why does it have to be before elle?

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoveTheDivergent

It translates to 'that she'. Its like C'est which is Ce and est together. Que does that for a couple of things qu'il (that he), qu'elle (that she), qu'on (that we/one) and others. It does make sense if you look at it as two seperate words - que elle, its just that its nicer when its shorter.

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillBigger

I translated it as "she wants the red dress" and was marked incorrect... I guess the emphasis is on the color.

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David335933

Duolingo is not accepting your translation because he wants you to understand that "que", qu'elle in this case, means the preposition "that" in English. For example you're looking for a specific red dress your girlfriend asked and your sister suggests a blue dress she sees. You could even say she wants a red dress, but more appropriate would be: the dress that she wants is red, which is the exact translation of "le robe qu'elle veut est rouge".

December 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maryli82

"The dress that she wants is red". In English, the main clause is "The dress is red". The part "that she wants" is an adjective/attributive/relative clause--a subordinate clause that modifies the noun "the dress". "That" is NOT a preposition; it marks the beginning of the clause and can be omitted in spoken or informal English because it is the "object" of "wants" in three clause. However, it cannot be left out in French. In English, you can also say "The dress which she wants is red", though the latter is more formal.

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbyRouge

I can't see dates on mobile, so I hope this isn't too late, but: red is predicative in this sentence. "The dress (that she wants) is red." It is red. Saying "the red dress" means it loses its predicative phrasing, and they're probably setting us up to get used to it by the time we start that lesson

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catrine843443

I agree with you. No native speaker one would ever say that sentence in the manner presented by the word for word translation.

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jurban50

I also translated it as you did and was marked wrong, but my feeling is that you and I are giving it a smoother "American" translation, and the program doesn't "like" that. Sometimes I feel like it's the difference between human and machine translation. On the other hand, you may be right, that it is about the color being the emphasis in the sentence - which is a perspective that I had not thought of. So, thanks for expanding my inner view!

December 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/renee.hanl

Naw, thats not it. Qu'elle is part of the relative clause in the sentence. The sentence is really an introduction to more complex sentences. The dress is red (le robe est rouge)is the main clause, and can stand on its own. The relative clause tells us more about the dress, in this case being the one "that she wants" (qu'elle veut). So altogether you get "the dress that she wants is red".

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

There is no problem saying "She wants the red dress" in French. "Elle veut la robe rouge." It's just a slightly different sentence. Just as in English, "She want the red dress" and "The dress she wants is red" are both perfectly fine sentences, but have slightly different meanings.

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johan807389

E.g. if you're looking at some dresses, you might say "she wants the red dress". If you're going to a store to pick up a dress she has already chosen and gets presented with a blue dress instead you might say "the dress she wants is red".

December 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selma-Ibrahim

The qu' is originally "que" right?

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinCroft

Yes, I think so :).

You use "qui" when you have only one subject like:

L'homme qui parle beaucoup. - The man that speaks a lot.

and you use "que" when you have two different subjects, for example:

La femme que je connais. - The woman that I know. :)

At least, that's how I think this works ;D.

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meiriona

That's it ! To be more complete, "qui" is introducing a relative clause which has the same subject as the main clause.

But "que" introduces a relative where the preceding noun is not the subject, but the object of the verb in the relative clause (in your example : what is known ? the woman). "qu' " is used when it is followed by a word beginning with a vowel.

Be careful, there are other structures where you can have two subjects, for example with "dont" : la femme dont je connais le nom. Here "la femme" is a complement of the noun "nom" -> what is known ? the name OF THE woman.

Hope it makes sense... :-/

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KomaGawa

confusing. the last part about dont. What is meant by "complement"?

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Dont means "of/from whom" or "of/from which," so "la femme dont je connais le nom" would be (literally) "the woman of whom I know the name" (normally translated as "the woman whose name I know").

It indicates possession, so it's a little confusing because in English we use possessives for that, but in French you always use "de." The woman's name=Le nom de la femme. "Dont" always relates to something that is the object of "de."

I wouldn't worry about understanding the "complement" part...just a word in grammar!

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinCroft

Merci beaucoup pour ta clarification Meiriona ! :))

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meiriona

Is it understandable ?? I never tried to explain French grammar directly in English lol ! :-)

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinCroft

Thanks again! :)

I believe you can use the phrase. It doesn't strike me as a particularly natural one :D but I guess it's fine.

Yes, I know. I remember I was quite surprised when I learned that it's 'le jour OÙ' ;D. Every language is different and I guess that's what I like about it all-their diversity :D.

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinCroft

I think it is :).

In fact, I might just add the translation of

"La femme dont je connais le nom."- "The woman whose name I know"

I just remembered that there is also 'où' :), right? :)

For example:

Le jour où je suis né(e)-The day I was born./ The day when I was born.

Le village où elle travaillait-The town where she worked.

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meiriona

That's right. Then the relation between the noun and the verb of the relative is different : the place where the action is happening with "où", and the time with "when".

An exception is in your example, it is a problem also for French speakers when they speak English : "le jour où je suis né" is really to know by heart, because it is not a place. In English is it possible to say "the day when I was born" ?

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asantewaa2

I thought it would be "qu'elle veut être" cos "veut" has already been conjugated therefore "être" should be in the infinitive. .?

December 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Oh, I get your confusion! Hmm...there is really only one verb in this sentence: être. Everything before that is the subject: La robe qu'elle veut (The dress [that she wants]) est (IS) rouge. The subject is the dress, and "that she wants" modifies that but "wants"is not the main verb of the sentence. So it's not a compound verb "wants is" (which would make no sense). It's only a compound very where you conjugate the first and put the second in the infinitive.

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/payam92

Why is the qu there in front of elle?

May 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.tastic

"La robe qu'elle veut est rouge."

In this sentence, there is the word "que", which basically means "that/which" in this context. You need "que" in French to connect "la robe" and "elle veut". "La robe elle veut est rouge" is wrong in French. Also, "que" elides before "elle", becoming "qu'".

July 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aeronautix

I have the same question too. When should "que" generally be used in such a way to mean "that/which"?

August 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.tastic

I think that it must be done in almost all cases.

August 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aeronautix

Looks like it's an obligatory/mandatory usage of a relative pronoun (e.g. who, that, which, etc.). Whereas the use of a relative pronoun in English is optional (and frequently omitted), its use in French is always necessary (similarly necessary in Spanish).

  • English: The dress (that) she wants is red.
  • French: La robe qu'elle veut est rouge.
  • Spanish: El vestido que quiere es roja.
May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grandien

I translated it as 'The dress what she wants is red'. And apparently it's incorrect. So, it only can be that but not what?

December 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Yes, in English you would say The dress THAT she wants (never "what"). Que can mean what, but in other contexts, generally as part of a question: Que fais-tu ? What are you doing? So there it's an interrogative pronoun, not a conjunction or a relative pronoun.

You CAN say in English something like "You know what you want." Vous savez ce que vous voulez."

December 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grandien

And what about which? The dress which she wants is red. Shouldn't that be a possibility?

December 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

I think so.

December 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mallika758737

I wrote the dress she wants is red But duolingo rejected it Why?

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

That's strange. They show the correct answer as the dress THAT she wants, but yours should also work.

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoGene

What's the purpose of "qu'" in this particular sentence?

May 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

The English is "The dress that she wants is red." Que=that (in this case - que is usually translated as "what"). You can drop it in English if you want (The dress she wants is red) but never in French.

May 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lamas_with_hats

So "qu'elle" can be used in not only questions but statements as well?

June 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Qu'elle=Que+elle (that+she)

Quel/quelle/quels/quelles is the word you are thinking of that is used in a question (it has other functions as well - you might want to look it up online or in a dictionary).

That little apostrophe is very important!

June 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tommys46

Isn't the translation "The dress that she wants red" right?

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

The dress that she wants is red.

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintjs

Qu' means 'who' right? I dont understand why they have used it for 'that'?

November 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Que" and "qui" are relative pronouns. They can translate to "who/whom/that/which".

  • "Qui" is the subject form and it never elides: "C'est la robe qui est ici" = It is the dress which/that is here.

  • "Que" is the object form and it elides to "qu'" when the next word starts with a vowel or a mute H: "C'est l'homme que je connais" = He is the man (whom) I know.

La robe qu'elle veut est rouge means "the dress that she wants is red.

In English "the dress she wants..." is correct, but in French, the relative pronoun is required.

November 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tranklements

Could "would like" be an acceptable translation as well as "want"? "She wants" sounds somewhat crude in English.

February 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

No, vouloir means to want. Just as in English, French has levels of politeness/directness that we have to learn.

Voudrait or aimerait would be more polite.

February 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vnucko7

Are we soon going to learn when and where to use commas in french in a lesson?

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

I have done the whole French tree and I don't remember any lessons about punctuation. Duo does not deal with it at all - you can leave out punctuation and it doesn't seem to mind.

February 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_.jaylynn_

why not the red robe is what she wants

March 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Changing the order of the words changes the meaning of the sentence, and would also require a different French sentence: La robe rouge est ce qu'elle veut. In your version, the emphasis becomes the fact that she wants it. The emphasis in the original is that the dress is red. Not the same thing.

In general, if you can translate word for word from the French into English and it makes a perfectly good sentence, start with that: La robe qu'elle veut est rouge. The dress that she wants is red. It doesn't always work word-for-word, but in this case it does. Why mess with it?

March 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenestcomp

I just can't tell that she is saying "veut." Sounds like "ou" to me.

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurynnSnow

Is there a pronunciation difference between "veut" "vous"? I couldn't figure out this listening exercise, because I could have sworn that was a "vous" right in middle of the sentence, and since it didn't make sense I couldn't figure out if it was "qu'elle" "quel" or "quelle." I'm not sure if there is a pronunciation difference in those either, so if anyone more knowledgeable could assist I would be in their debt. Merci !

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Yes, those vowel sounds are extremely different. Hopefully someone else will answer with some links, but there are lots of resources for learning the different sounds, including audio files where you can hear them demonstrated. I'm sure a bit of Googling will turn up something. You may also want to read about the different lip positions for the vowels. In vous, the lips are quite rounded and pushed forward, quite different from veut.

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew459948

SEE, THE SKIP PART WAS MOSTLY FRENCH TO ENGLISH, PASSED IT.

HAD IT BEEN MOSTLY ENGLISH TO FRENCH -- YOU KNOW THAT PART, LEARNING THE FRENCH LANGUAGE -- I WOULD HAVE FAILED.

THANKS DUOLINGO!!

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew459948

SEE, THE "SKIP TO LEVEL 5", PASSED IT. SINCE IT WAS MAINLY FRENCH TO ENGLISH, NOT REALLY LEARNING ANYTHING, PASS!! Nice!!

HAD IT BEEN FROM ENGLISH TO FRENCH -- YOU KNOW, LEARNING THE FRENCH LANGUAGE SO I CAN USE EVERYDAY -- I WOULD HAVE FAILED.

BUT, SINCE THE FRENCH COURSES USE WAY TOO LITTLE FRENCH, PASSED IT WITHOUT LEARNING.

THANKS DUOLINGO!!

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShainaVivi

Why is "she wants the red dress" wrong?

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niniko4

she wants the red dress = Elle veut la robe rouge. But the right answer is the dress that she want is red, in this sentence we emphasese on the colour, and express the same meaning in defferent way, it may called - ''more difficult version ''

May 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kamoteque

I thought you'd use vouloir instead of veut. How do you know when to use the être form of the verb?

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xbecenti15

Vouloir is the infinite form of the verb, to want. You only use the infinitive version of a verb if it is followed by a previous verb. "verb + infinitive form of a verb" Ex: " <<Je veux regard(er) la télé .>> I want to watch T.V.

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Veut is part of the conjugation of vouloir. Je veux/tu veux/il elle veut/ nous voulons/vous voulez/ ils elles veulent

What do you mean by the "être form of the verb"?

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dan.bondarenko

I know that pronouncing liaisons at the end of verbs is optional, but can the T at the end of veut be pronounced in this sentence?

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

No, this liaison is forbidden.

November 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/map36

Any body explain the differents qu et que?

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Qu' is used before words beginning with a vowel or mute h.

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kentymanlol

what the ❤❤❤❤

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SageHamilton

i dont understand the qu'elle part?

June 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

La=The

robe=dress

que=that

elle=she

veut=wants

est=is

rouge=red.

La robe qu'elle veut est rouge=The dress (that) she wants is red.

We can drop the word "that" in English if we want. Also, "que" in front of a word that starts with a vowel contracts to qu'.

June 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StalkStabb

It's incorrect to put "that" in English.

January 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

No it isn't, but it can be omitted.

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R3M_0

Why can't i just say "The dress she want is red"?

February 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

That's not grammatical English. It should be The dress she wants is red.

February 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeM136

F###

May 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatsyWebb2

This not what a native English speaker would say, regardless of grammatical construction. It is a clumsy translation.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesMarro2

If we are going to have recordings, maybe pronounce the v in veut. We are still learning, remember!

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaoWu23

The dress what she wants is red should be right.

March 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

That, not what. Unless you are speaking a very lower-class form of British English.

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernWe0

The English scentence is a bit strange, you wouldn't say it like that. I would say it as this person.... likes this dress and it is red.

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Vouloir means to "want," not to "like."

You can say "She wants the red dress" by using a different French sentence: Elle veut la robe rouge. It has a slightly different emphasis. But the point is that we need to learn how to say both, because we have to learn how to use the French construction that uses "que" to connect two clauses.

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/albyedw

Shouldnt it be subjunctive?

September 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

No, you are probably getting confused because many uses of the subjunctive are introduced by a verb followed by "que," (ie Je veux que tu viennes) but that doesn't mean every time you see que it indicates the subjunctive. Note that in this case, the verb comes later in the sentence. That's a clue that it is not subjunctive, but that que is acting a pronoun replacing what come just before it (The dress that she likes).

May 1, 2016
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