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"Ese curso es un fracaso."

Translation:That course is a failure.

0
4 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/snowdove

I was so excited that Duolingo was owning up to their errors that I translated it as "this" instead of "that." HAHAHA... (Just joshing.)

48
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollermama

Me too

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Supr_Spac
Supr_Spac
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i think it's in reference to the "idioms" spanish course you can buy for lingots

15
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Actually, it's the 'Flirting' course they're talking about. How many Duolingo users ACTUALLY got to date people with that course?

16
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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I'm pretty sure more users got arrested for using that section. Or kicked in the groin.

13
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomasitoBarton

unless they were presidential candidates

8
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaptainAmirica

Oh snap, Tom Barton

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Supr_Spac
Supr_Spac
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are you a model?

2
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

What's this supposed to mean? Food, racing course, study?

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

We have no context, so it means what it means in English. Whatever 'track you are on' will lead to a bad outcome. Addictive behavior? College class? Sedentary lifestyle? A life of crime? Bad choices of friends, partners, jobs, etc.? My dictionary suggests 'curso' = academic course or personal development, life path, as well as development of public works, city planning, and the like.

26
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I think when you have "curso" alone, it's rather about scholarship. I found: Academic: "El curso escolar" = school year. "El curso sugiente = the next grade. Curso = class/lesson/session/training, etc...

Life/activity: Curso = ex: el curso de su actividad = the course of his work. El curso ordinario de los negocios= the normal course of business. El curso de la vida = the lifetime.

For city planning, I don't see what it can be, if someone knows...

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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For city planning, I don't see what it can be, if someone knows...

In English, "course" is often shorthand for "course of action", meaning a planned series of steps toward a goal.

If either the intended goal is a bad idea, or the steps don't lead directly toward it after all (due to an unforeseen influence or interference) then the course [of action] can be said to be a failure or mistake.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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Here's a great resource when you have a question like that.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Curso

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

That course (of action) is in such a fracas. (Not a translation, but to illustrate the cognate and the relationship of "fracaso".

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyColson

There, there, Duo... It's the thought that counts.

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saparris

A course—either a means of getting somewhere or something taken for academic credit—cannot "be" a failure. The former can lead to failure, and poor performance in the latter can result in failure. However, "that course is a failure" is just unnatural in English.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evisceratorium

I disagree. What if an academic course fails to teach its students what it sets out to? Such a course would be considered a failure. Honestly, that's the first thing that I thought of when I read the sentence.

12
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnlvs2run

Fiasco means failure, so I think "that course is a fiasco" should be acceptable, plus the words are similar in both languages.

1
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Fiasco is a somewhat stronger word than failure. There is a similar word to fracaso in English. Don't use it though; fracas actually means tumulto o disturbio o gresco.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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un fracaso = a disaster (Lo acepta.) 7 enero 2016

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeannineRN

Yea, i used "fracas". Oops. 201507

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billy8195

Quit talking about yourself like that Duolingo.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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un fracaso = a disaster (Lo acepta.) 7 enero 2016

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

I cannot tell if this is Duolingo smack-talking other courses, or if Duolingo's talking about itself (Himself?). Obviously nothing against Duolingo, though.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrrha01
Myrrha01
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If this course appears to some as 'un fracaso' it's probably due to their individual language-learning limitations rather than to DuoLingo as such. Despite some of its shortcomings I find this course quite helpful.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

I would have totally agreed with you a few weeks ago. Then I got to the Future tense lessons. That's somewhat forgivable because it's not super common, but I think basic grammar structures are important regardless.

Then I got to the "subjunctive/imperative" section and was appalled to find such an essential part of Spanish grammar simply glossed over in two lessons. And it looks like the rest of the tree will largely follow suit.

I mean, it makes sense. The ad money is in the early lessons, so they stretch those out to satisfy those who fall off the wagon early and leave us hanging without a complete understanding of the language we're about to start practicing reading, writing, and comprehending as we move on to more advanced teaching tools.

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hermione256

Interesting how languages learn from each other... fracaso is likely from the French word fracas!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

At least duo's self aware

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsj5105
jsj5105
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Why doesn't "that class is a failure" work?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Curso = course Clase = class

Even though the two are very similar, Duo usually likes when you use the best, most direct translation for a word, not a synonym.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I wanted to say, "That course is a mess." Could anyone tell me if this cold be a translation?

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Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gresty2013

I would say so, but it depends on the register of your translation, as calling something a mess is a bit colloquial.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamdorf

How about "that course is a mistake"?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meri_berl

can someone explain why it is wrong to say a fail here? i'm not a native english speaker...

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamdorf

"fail" is a verb, not a noun. It is not a "thing". That said, there has been a general trend (annoying to some like me) over the past several decades to start using some verbs as nouns, and nouns as verbs. For example, when I was young "parent" was not used as a verb, and it still sounds a bit strange to my mid-western USA ears, but overwhelming usage has prevailed, and now "to parent" is standard usage, so parent is both a noun and a verb. You will hear in vernacular speech someone saying "That is a fail.", but at this point it is bad english. Correct is "That is a failure". Wait a few years though and who knows!

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Uz-Zaman
Uz-Zaman
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That is what i thought about my university degree, thank you duolingo for agreeing with me.

Gracias

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyboardo

Ah, a phrase I might employ to describe an Alpha Omega curriculum!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamLarge
AdamLarge
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Me encanta la palabra fracaso

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrrha01
Myrrha01
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Si, a pesar de su significado , lol

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Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidA.Foo

Need help distinguishing this and that in Spanish.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gresty2013

The answer "That year is a failure" should be accepted (but wasn't). As there is no context, any of the many possible translations of "course" should be accepted, especially "(school) year" as it is a very common translation.

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Reply1 year ago