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  5. "Πέντε μέτρα και δέκα εκατοστ…

"Πέντε μέτρα και δέκα εκατοστά."

Translation:Five meters and ten centimeters.

November 10, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snommelp

So the word for "centimeters" has no relation to the word for meters? Or am I just not seeing the connection?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/panagiotis_ts

The word "εκατοστό" (= cm) is derived from the number "εκατό" (= 100). One "εκατοστό" means 1/100 (of a meter). :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snommelp

Yeah, I figured that was probably the case. I suppose it's similar to how kilograms are often referred to as simply "kilos."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Precisely.

You could call them εκατοστόμετρα, I suppose ("hundredths of a metre") but the "hundredth" bit is often used for short, pretty much like "kilo" for "kilogram".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark958555

In a scientific paper, how would centimeter be abbreviated in Greek? With the international "cm" or with "εμ" or something like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995
Mod
  • 181

It is εκ. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Probably cm. At least the Latin abbreviations are used in school http://ebooks.edu.gr/modules/ebook/show.php/DSGYM-B200/530/3508,14387/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995
Mod
  • 181

@kirakrakra You are right about that. I was referring to the Greek way of abbreviating it. In school, we used both εκ. and cm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Futher information: εκατοστόμετρο, το = εκατοστός (1/100:th) + μέτρο came into Greece in 1831 as a translation of the Fr. centimétre. Later it got the shortened synonym εκατοστό, το.

εκατοστόγραμμο, το came 1883 fr. Fr centigramme and εκατοστόλιτρο, το came in 1891 fr. Fr. centilitre. They are of course never shortened to εκατοστό


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieter667754

and is then χιλιοστόμετρο (mm) also shortened to χιλιοστό ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicole966706

Does τα μέτρα mean both measurements and metres?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

yes, both, μέτρο το means 1meter 2measure 3measuring tape, in plural measurements. Also in a lot of phrases, the most known by Cleobulus (6:th century BC, one of the Seven Sages)

παν μέτρον άριστον/ moderation in all is best


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieter667754

Is it also possible to use "το πόντος"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

It is, I've added it, but I don't think it's as common anymore. For younger people, at least, but yes it's ok in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieter667754

You are right, I'm older (60+》and I'm talking usually with older people... so I came across with πόντος for centimetre ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vemund75118

Hm. That is strange. Πόντος/Pontos also was the name of a country in the north of Turkey, along the coast of the Black sea. The scandinavians called this land Asagartia. The romans conquered Pontos about 60 years before Yeshua was born, and emigrants from Pontos even reached Scandinavia, and where they today is incorporated in Norwegian mythology, called "aeser"(asagartians). What does the word ποντος litarally mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Duo's πόντος,ο is 1)cm (colloquial) 2. a measure unit for length, generally 3. point in games 4. knitting stitch < Venetian ponto/ peak, nose

Your very interesting remark concerns probably the other πόντος, ο = the open sea. In old Greek it meant a passage in the sea, (Ελλής-ποντος/ Hellespont, Εύξεινος Πόντος/ Black Sea) < I.E. pent-/ go, walk < Sanscrit pánthâb/ way (Fr. pont, Sp. puente)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hafizen

This whole thread is a delight to read from an etymological perspective. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 278

Your comments are always so pleasant, thank you.

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